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Full text of "Maids and a Man 1922"

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UBRARY USE ONLY 



REESE LIBRARY 

Augusta College 
Augusta, Georgia 



Volume Three 



SfUiids and Jl Man 



^->i 








Published by 

Students of Tubman High School 

Augusta, Georgia 

RIDGELY-WING-TIDWELL COMPANY. AUGUSTA, GA. 



.4 



TO 



3fulm A. Jltarlj 

One who was always been an insjjiration to us 
and a friend in all that we have undertaken to do. 
Her beautiful ideals, love of truth, and wisdom, v.ill 
ever remain dear in our memories. To her with love 
we the Senior Class of Nineteen Hundred Twenty- 
Two do dedicate this volume of 

"Hatba mh A iian" 




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Tubman MAIDS and A .MAX ClaxK '£2 



To Whom It May Concern: 

We, the staff, have endeavored in this Annual to 
present the various acts and scenes of the "Drama of 
School Life" with tlie true cast of characters. There 
are major actors and minor actors in this play; 
some of us monopolize the stage while others must 
be content with merely being extras. We have tried 
to give each her proper place and importance, but 
what can be perfect.'' Realizing many deficiencies 
and defects of the third volume of "Maids and A 
Max," the Editors jjresent to your not unkind critic- 
ism, we hope, the result of many hours of arduous 
labor, begging j'ou to recall the words of the famous 
poet who said : 

"The readers get the pleasure. 
The writers get the fame. 
The printers get the money, 

But the staff — it gets the blame.' 

—THE STAFF OF 1922. 



(') 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAX Class ''22 



Faculty 



1. Mrs. Margaret H. Hurst History and English 

2. Miss Helen E. Frank ..English 

J 3. Miss Mary B. McCaxts Mathematics 

4. Miss Eloise McBeth Applied Art 

>v5. Miss Mary E. Hamilton Latin 

6. Miss Virgixl\ Videtto ..Domestic Science 

7. Miss Mildred Abern.\thy- Mathematics 

8. Mrs. W. C. Emerson ....Physics and General Science 

9. Miss Furlow Hollingsworth Commercial Subjects 

10. Miss Olivia Russell Spanish and French 

11. Miss Lora M. Pearce ..English 

f\ 12. Miss Gertrude J. Comey- English 

13. Mrs. Lillian Green ..History and Civics 

1-i. Miss Willamette Green ...Mathematics 

15. Miss Anna H. Ward Com. Geog. and Physiology 

16. Miss Mag.^ret E. B.\ker .History 

~^ 17. Miss Louise P.^rks English 

k18. Miss Ada G. Woods English 

XlQ. Miss Pauline Holley Mathematics 

20. T. H. Garrett Principal 

\ 21. Miss Gladys M. Briscoe ....Physical Training 

22. Miss Lois Eve Civics and General Science 

X 23. Miss Annie M. Page French 

24. Mrs. Stannard Owens Librarian 

"*> 25. Miss Frances L. West Chemistry and Biology 

^ 26. Miss Marci.\ A. Cl.^rk Domestic Arts 

^27. Miss A. Dorothy Hains Latin 

^28. Miss Jull\ A. Flisch History and Economics 

(9) 



Class 'n MAIDS and A MAN Tuhi 

Senior Faculty Song 

(With Apologies to Kipling) 
O 

We've taken our fun where we've found it 

And now we must bid you good-bye. 
Tho" we laugh on one side of our faces, 

On the other we heave a great sigh. 
Under class men will ever be with us, 

The ''buzz" that goes on in the hall — ! 
But you Juniors beware ! for tlie Faculty's there — 

Each item of note we recall. 

Miss Comey, still in a great hurry. 

Ever watching and waiting alert. 
Miss Woods, who moves slower, but surer, 

Her password is "amuse and divert." 
Miss Flisch, with her own "Bless Milandy," 

When anyone dares say "ahem." 
They have worked with a will to help our brains fill, 

And we've learned about Tubman from them. 

Mrs. Emerson teaches us physics. 

She's said to be easy, not hard. 
Miss Hollingsworth, youtliful and pretty, 

IJkes to dictate by the yard. 
Miss West, dissects bugs, frogs and fishes 

With an unconcerned air, if you please; 
So they've helped us to see everything as it "be," 

And we've learned about Tubman from these. 

Triangles, squares, lines and circles 

Are naught to Miss "Holley, it seems. 
"Que voulez-vous faire ce matin.'" 

Is one of Miss Page's known themes. 
^ Now, Miss Briscoe's great cliarms would take volumes, 

* ' Her "crushes" out numl)er her foes. 

And we know from her song, that all men aren't wrong. 
So we've learned about Tubman from these. 

Miss Greene, tho' not slender and nymph-like. 

Solves geometry questions with speed. 
Miss Dora's hobby is Latin, 

She eats up translation with greed. 
But one word is due Mr. Garrett", 

We esteem and admire his "vim"; 
He has shown us the way to gain knowledije each day, 

And we've learned aliout Tulmian from him. 

We've taken our fun where we've found it. 

And now we're relating the tale. 
We could tell things that would nuike you shudder 

And tremble, and grow thin and pale. 
But we hope you've not tired listening 

To these things we take time to discuss. 
So take heed, one and all, lest you stumble and fall. 

And learn about Tubman from us. 

— Melville Doughty. 



(10) 



1 



M 



Clfiss '£iB 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tub) 



Senior Poem 



We have wandered thru forests of brambles, 

Thru flowering, shady fields, 
Thru sunshine and rain, with loss and witii gain; 

We know what the end reveals. 



We've found trees of knowledge and friendship, 

Wliere little birds sing day by day. 
Thru right and thru wrong, we've found many a thorn 

That ])rickcd and obstructed our way. 

'Till at last we have reached a fair garden 
Where bloom flowers bright, of all hue ; 

Where perfumes alone and the bees' soft drone 
Fill one with joy thru and thru. 

Tlie woodland of brambles and flowers. 

Is Tubman, more dear to us now. 
Of sunshine and rain, of loss and of gain 

We've all had our share somehow. 

And the trees of knowledge and friendship 

Are our teaciiers and comrades true. 
Each pricking thorn, the rigiit and tiie wrong, 

They've helped us to conquer, too. 

And last, but not least, the fair garden 

Is our Graduation Dav; 
So we bid you good-bye, with a tear and a sigh, 

May God bless you in every way ! 

— Melville B. Doughtv. 



(12) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Clu^s '£^ 



Colors — Green and White 



Senior Class 



Motto — B- 



Floxcer — White Rose 



Rosabel Burch '^ 

"A lovinji heart in the beginning! of 
knowledye-" 

President of Class, '22, '21; Varsity 
Team B. B., '22; Class Team B. B., '22, 
'19. 



Anxie B. Daniel x. 

"Her smile is sweetened bi/ her yravity." 

Class Team B. B., '19, '20, '21, '22; 
Vice-President of Class, '22; Asst. Busi- 
ness Mgr., '21; Hockey Team, '20, '21; 
Class President, '20; Sec. Athletic As- 
scoiation, '20. 



Lucy Watkins 

"Unthinkiny, idle, wild and youny, 
I laughed, and danc'd and talked, and 
sitny." 

Secretary and Treasurer Senior Class; 
Secretary and Treasurer Junior Class. 




(13) 



Class "k 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Louise Adams 

'From her lips dropped gentle ■words." 



EnxA Agee 

■'Hii/li-rrceted lli(iii</lits seated in the 
heart of coiirtesji.'' 

Athletic Editor of the Annual; Senior 
Hepresentative on Athletic Council; 
t'arsity, '22, '20; Class Teams, "22, '21, 
'20, '19; President Junior-Senior Y. W. 
C. A. Club; Hockey Team, '21. 



Maucauet Blitchington 

"Think nniujht a trifle tlioni/li it small 

appear. 
Small sands make the mountains, dai/s 

the I/ear." 

Class Team B. B., "22. 



Esther Bogoslawsky 

'■//■ we should encounter a man of rare 
intellect, we should ask him what books 
he read." 



(U) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class "B'2 



Agnes Bohler 

'•/ huilt mij soul a lorclli/ pleasure house 
wherein at ease for aye to dwell." 



Anna Elizabeth Branch A 

^■Whence is thy learning? Hath thy 
toil o'er books consumed the midniqht 
oil?" 

Business Mgr. Annual, '22; Vice-Presi- 
dent of Class, '21, '20; Class Team B. B., 
'21, '20, '19; Second Varsity, '20; Hockey 
Team, '21, '20. 



DoROTH. Bredenserg '^ 

'"Tis -well to be merry and wise, 
'Tis well to be honest and true." 



Helen Brenner y 

"She that was ever fair and never proud, 
Had tonque at will and yet was never 
loud." 




(15) 



Class "k 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Myrtis Brown 

''She loves art in a seemly tt'cufy 
With an earnest soul and a capital .1. 



Thelma Cannon 

"And for our country, 'Tis bliss to die'-" 



Elizabeth Carrere a 

"One E.IR it heard; at the OTHER 
out it went.'' 



Alberta Caspary 

'T'lcas bUru.' for bioxc, d'tuputimj inrh by 
inch, 
For one wouUI not retreat, nor t'other 
flinch." 

Varsity, '22; Class Teams B. B., '22, 
"21; Class Teams Hockey, '21, '20. 



(16) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A jMAN 



Class '2"2 



Myrtle Chx'echili, -^ 
"Silence is (/olden." 



CE / 



EiLA Clarke 

"Of all her parts her eyes express 
The sweetest kind of bashfvlness." 



Ruth Cooper ^ 

"Man is bron to trouble as the sparks (o 
//// itpiL'ard." 



Eloise Davidson / 

'As merry as the day is long." 




Clasa -22 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Edxa Davis 

"'Put iimtr triiKt in iioiir mirror and 
keep i/(nir iiuxeder dry.'' 



Melville DofGHTv / 

■■Wlmxe words all earn took captive." 

President Athletic Association, '22 
Class Team Hockey, '20. 



Elinor Elliott ' 

"Theji are only truly great who are 
truly yood." 



Mildred Gardner 



J 



"Her ijloHsy hair wax clu.ifered o'er a 
l}rozc 
Briyht with intelliijenre and fair and 
.smooth.'' 

Vice-President Titian C'liili, '22; Vice- 
President Atliletic Association, '21 ; Class 
Secretary and Treasurer, '20. 



(18) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Mass "2"2 



Bessie Belle Gilchrist X 

"Her voice ■was ever soft, gentle and 
Jo-d.\ an excellent thinti in zcoman." 



Carolyn Gilchrist ^ 

"Whose little body lodged a might g 
mind." 



Kathleen Gilchrist ^ 

"For 'tis the mind that makes the 
body rich." 



Irene Grusin ^ 

'Learning by study must be won." 




Class 'm 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Paulixe Hardin < 

"All (men) are dumb when beaulii 
pleadeth." 

Class Team B. B., "22. 



JosiE Hall /< 

'•A hard befiinnin(i makes a good ending." 



Blanche Harrison n 

"Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind." 



Mary Henry 

'To friends a friend, hozc kind to all." 



(20) 



Tubman 



IMAIDS and A MAN 



Class "B'B 



Edxa Hutchixsox V 

"Wisdom is the principal tliiiu/; there- 
fore get zc'isdom." 

Asst. Literary Editor, '21. 



Mattie Ixglett ^ 

'27i.v modesty's a candle to thy merit." 



Mildred Jenxixgs *. 

"Two souls with but a single thought; 
Two hearts that beat as one." 



Clifford Kelly n 

"Fashioned so slenderly, young and so 
fair." 

Class Team B. B., '22. 




Class '22 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Ruth Kitchen 

'■-/ facf with gladness nversprend." 
Class Team B. B., "22. 



Dessie Kuhlke 

'•Love, sweetness, (/niiilness, in liir per- 
snii shine so clear." 

Editor-in-Chief of Annual, '22; Presi- 
dent of Honor League, "22; Asst. Editor- 
in-liief of Annual, "21 ; Secretary of 
Honor League, '21. 



Kleanor Lanham K 

■■oh; Whij should life nil labor be? Let 

me alone.'' 

Class Teams B. B., "22, "20, '19; Sec- 
retary-Treasurer Glee Club, '21. 



JESTHER LiTCHENSTEIN 

"Thy wit is as quick as the ijretihound's 
month; it catches." 



(22) 



Tubn 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '22 



Inez Lyox )k 

'Rare compound of oihlili/, frolic, and 

fnn. 
Wlio relished a joke and rejoic'd in a 
pun." 



Elizabeth Maesh y 

"True happiness consists not in the 
multitude of friends, bvt in the worth 
and choice." 



Elizabeth Matthews 

"A peasinij countenance is no slight 
advantai/e." 



Frances Matthews -^ , 

'.ind yet believe vie good as well as ill: 
Woman's at best ii contradiction still." 




Class "k 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tuh man 




Vera McGowax \ . 

"■O, I'm ftal/d icith hiiufliter.'' 

Varsity, '22, '21; Class Teams B. B., 
"22, '21, '20; Asst. Athletic Editor, An- 
nual Staff "21; Hckev Team, "20. 



Dorothy Merry / 
■oh, fi) ilriirrf all niiiht and drcxg all dai/-" 



Ruth Miller ^ 

".!/// hr<irl is ever at tftiin' .icrx'icc. 



JOSIE MiLLIGAX 



"The mUilmt mannir ami thi- (ivntlesl 
heart." 



(2+) 



Tub in (in 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Clans 'M 



Elizabeth Mohi.ey a 

"The onl(/ ilisaclvaiila(/e of an honest 
heart is creduUti/." 

Class Team B . B., '22, '21; Class 
Hookey Team, '21. 



Amelia Mohrmann 

"When one (e.vnm) I'.v past, another care 
■we have. 
Thus woe sttceeds a woe as a wave a 
wave." 

Class Representative Honor Council, 
'21. 



LiLA Morris '^, 

"Wedding is destiny and hanging is 
likewise." 



Bessie Moye "^ ■ 
"Still waters run deep." 




Class '& 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Evelina Mulcay (( 

"GentUj to hear, kindUi to judi/e." 

Class Team Hockey, '21; Class Team 
B. B., '19. 



NoNiE Mullins 

".-/ roxybiid set Kith little leilful thorns, 
As sweet as Tubman's air could make 
her." 

Class Representative Honor Council, 
■22, -21. 



Mildred O'Neal 
"Life is not life at all without delight." 



MONTIXE PaRDUE X- 

'Thc ail-enclosini/ freehold of content." 



Tubman 



AIAIDS and A MAX 



Class '"22 



Eleanor Patch ^ 

'Of manners i/enfle. of dhpoaitiiin niihi." 



Comer Phillips -v 

'/ loaf and invite mi/ soul." 



/ 

Felicia Ransey ^ 

"Life is too short for mean anxieties." 



Charlie Mae Scattergood 

"And join with thee calm Peace and 
Quiet." 




(27) 



Class '22 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Marguerite Scott ^ 

"Let the ic^urhl glide: let the world <fo; 
A fuj of care and a fig for woe." 

Class Teams B. B., '22, '21, '20; Hockey 
Team, '20. 



Saphronia Scott 

'/ am not merri/, but I do l)e(/uile 
The thin;/ I am by seeming otherwise." 



Frances Sherman X 

"■(Irare was in all her .itejts. 
Heaven in her eyes." 

Class Team B. B., "22, '19; Class Team 
Hockey, '20. 



Josephine Sibley ^ 

"Let (jentleness mil strong enforce- 
ment be." 



(28) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Clasn '£"2 



Sarah B. Simmoxs 

"As the brifiht xun (/lorifies the sky, 
So is her face iUumlned with her eye." 

Photo Mgr. Annual, '22; Asst. Photo 
Mgr. Annual, '21. 



Lillian Skixxeu 

"All her faults observed; set in a note 
book, learned and conned by rote" 



AvicE Smith ^ 

"Two friends, two bodies, with one soul 
inspired." 



Helen Smith \ 

"Make haste, thy better foot before.' 




(29) 



Clas 



]\IAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Lucille Steinberg 

"'Tis not what man Doen which e^valts 
him, but what man would do." 



Ethel Stone ^ 

"Thought is the wind, knnwledffe the 
nail, and mankind the vessel." 



Martha Story 

'He silent and safe, silence never be- 
trays you." 



Virginia Sturman /^ 

"Sttidji to be quiet." 



(30) 



Tub man 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class W2 



Kathryx Twiggs x 

"Do not delttji, do not delai/: the ijoJden 
moments fly!" 



Elise Van Pelt -^ 

"Aye cannot ■wither her, nor customs 
stale, her infinite variety." 



Dora Vlachos 

"To Qreece we give our shimmeriny 
blades." 



Eleanor Walton ;^ 

"None but herself could be her parallel." 

Literary Editor Annual, '22; Varsity 
Team B. "b., '22; Class Team B. B., '22, 
'21, '20. 




Class "k 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




LORETTA WaTSOX /^ 

' Carr to mi/ coffin adds a nail, no doubt; 
.Ind (Very .imile draii\i one out." 

Class Team B. B., "22; Class Team 
Hockey, "20; Class President, "19. 



Dorothy Wheeler ^- 

'■Y(t tauyht l>ii time mil heart has learned 
to ijloiv 
For other's yood, and melt at other's 
•woe." 



Florence White 

"The deed I intend Ik (jreat : hut what, 
as i/et, I know not." 

Art Editor of Annual Staff, "22; Asst. 
Art Editor of Annual Staff, '21; Class 
Team B. B., '22. 



Maudelle When 

"A sweet attractive kind of grace." 

Class Team B. B., '20; Class Team 
Hoc-kev, ^'O. 



(32) 



Tubman MAIDS and A :MAN Clags 'n 



Senior Class History 



00 write the history of tlic chiss ol' 1922 is no small undertaking. To ac- 
cord to each the proper amount of respect, honor, and glory due to the 
members of this illustrious class, and at the same time, to maintain our 
reputation for a modest, unassuming, and retiring nature, is indeed an Her- 
culean task. Desiring to do this at any cost, however, we shall note briefly 
onlv a few of the most important accomplishments of the past years. 

Seijtember, 1918, saw the beginning of our career at Tubman. One bun- 
dled and sixteen strong, and, realizing the enormity of our ignorance and the 
stupendousness of the tasks before us. we banded together with the fixed deter- 
mination to overcome every probable obstacle and to win every possible laurel. 
We found that by sticking together, it was much easier to endure the peculiar 
humiliations incident to a Freshman's life ; and that, by practicing on each 
other, it was possible to acliicve that exceeding blase manner characteristic of 
every Sophomore, and coveted by every Freshman. Thus prepared with this 
''whole armor" we took the school by storm, allowing no line of activity to 
escape us. We entered into athletics with a mighty zeal. Our teams dis- 
played wonderful skill, but, as fate would have it, we failed to win a single game 
of basket ball or hockey ! As one means of drowning our grief over this dread- 
ful misfortune we came forth in all our glory in the never-to-be-forgotten Vic- 
tory Parade. This was the first occasion on which our class had appeared in 
public as a real part of the school. 

Of course every truly great organization has its "ups and downs," and the 
class of '22 has been no exception. We were victims of the "flu" epidemic that 
year suffering acute anguish of spirit because, on this account, school had to be 
discontinued at two different times, and, for the first time in our history, we had 
the painful experience of going to school on Saturday. Another misfortune of 
our first year at Tubman was the appearance of a new Latin teacher at reg- 
ular intervals of every two months. 

In order to cope with our new dignity and elevation of mind, we were trans- 
ferred to the second floor at the beginning of our Sophomore year. Duriilg 
this year a number of significant changes took place within the sphere of Tub- 
man. For the first time in many years we competed with other schools in ath- 
letics and we, the Sophomores, were thoroughly confident that it w-as due to the 
work of our representatives on the basket ball team that some of the games 
were such overwhelming victories. The Athletic Association was also organ- 
ized that year, as well as the Honor League, both of which are student organ- 
izations. The Glee Club put on a very successful operetta, "Miss Cherry- 

(33) 



Class '22 MAID S and A MAN Tubman 

blossom," in wliich a number of the talented Sophomores starred as chorus girls. 
And last, it was also in this eventful year that the first edition of "Maids and 
A Man" was published, which, altiio' it was under the supervision of the Senior 
Class, was contributed to by several of the Sophomores. 

The fall of 1920 saw a smaller but wiser looking "bunch" of girls back at 
scliool. What we lacked in members, however, was made up for by the achieve- 
ments of those who were here. Greetings were exchanged, old times talked of, 
and it was not long before we were again hard at work. And truly it was 
work ! With the spirit of the task masters of old, our teachers drove us on and 
on, relentlessly demanding tiiat we search more diligently for the ethereal phan- 
tom. Knowledge. In spite of this, however, we managed to find time to put on 
an operetta, "Tlie Gypsy Rover," for the purpose of raising funds for tlie 
memorable Senior banquet. Both of tiicse events will long linger in our mem- 
ories as two of the happiest affairs of our high school days. Thus, another 
year passed. 

Nineteen hundred and twenty-two has at last arrived and with it has come 
our last year at Tubman. We are now Seniors. What a step it has been 
from '18 to '22 ! But we iiave stepped it safely, and the reward is not far off. 
Long and tiresome lias been the race, but the goal is at least in sight, and the 
much coveted and once far-off diploma is almost witiiin our grasj). Our ranks 
are greatly diminished, for one reason and another. Some of our early class- 
mates have entered into the sacred bands of matrimony, others have "flunked," 
and others have departed for realms — we know not wliere. But in spite of this, 
our number is now seventy-seven and we have the honor of being the largest 
graduating class Tubman has ever produced. Tlie responsibilities of the 
Senior Class have rested lightly, but safely, on our shoulders. We have at last 
proved our merit in athletics by winning the school championship in basket 
ball ; and several members of the erstwhile Varsity team, now the Eurekas, have 
come from the Senior Class. 

Such is our past and present. The future confronts us. We have no in- 
tellectual giants in our class, few gifted writers or born poets ; far fewer still 
are our scientists or mathematicians. What we iiave learned has cost, in many 
cases, considerable effort and mucii hard study ; yet, as we leave Tubman, we 
sliould not like to convey the impression tiiat all our time has been labor, for 
we now look back, and will, in the years to come, upon tiie many good times, 
and happy days that we have spent together at Tubman. 

— Clifford Kelly. 



(34) 



Tubman IMAIDS ami A MAN Class '22 



Class Prophecy 



* f'UXE 1, 1932, was the most important date in Tubman's liistory since 
^ A- that memorable day on which a young man visited Tubman. The stage 
was in gala dress, a wilderness of ferns and palms, and Marguerite Scott, 
■who succeeded Emma, was hurrying around tr3'ing to adjust the liglits. Yes, 
it was the "Experience Banquet" of the Seniors of 1922. Florence White, 
Paris' leading artist, had arrived in time to decorate the table, which was a 
dream of loveliness. It really seemed like old times. Some of the girls didn't 
appear a day older than on the night we graduated, especially Sara B. Sim- 
mons and ]Mildred Gardner. Kathryii Twiggs, too, Jiad preserved her youth- 
ful looks so well that we all pounced on her for the formula of the compound. 
But will vou believe me when I tell you that Maudelle Wren and Annie B. 
Daniel have acquired grey hair.'' In fact Annie B's is almost as pretty as Miss 
Flisch's. However, it has been rumored that it changed prematurely on ac- 
count of a terrible disappointment in 

We were extremely sorry when we heard the chairman of the invitation 
committee read the notes of regret from Dorothy Merry, Ethel Stone, Anna 
Elizabeth Branch, and Carolyn Gilchrist. 

It was impossible for "Dot" to be with us since she will not sail from Leip- 
sic, Germany, where she is studying piano, until November. 

Ethel has just married, and is on her honeymoon. Kathleen Gilchrist re- 
ported that Ethel's husband is an oil king who has just returned, according to 
a promise made eight years ago, to claim his bride when he should have made 
his fortune. 

A Chautauqua of national fame boasts one of our 1922 graduates. The 
fine old girl we knew as Anna Elizabeth Branch, charms large audiences by 
singing and playing, while her husband accompanies her with the violin. Anna 
Elizabeth states that she was disappointed not to be able to come since this is 
their busiest season. 

It was impossible for Carolyn to get a leave of absence just at present. It is 
generally understood that Johns-Hopkins is very fortunate in having her on 
its permanent staff of nurses. After she graduated, one of the doctors, for 
rather personal reasons, persuaded her to stay. 

Since this was a banquet, Inez Lyon was on hand to partake of the substan- 
tials as well as to be the first to relate her experience, as she used to start 
everything in classes. 

As Inez rose, she looked quite as nifty in her becoming gown as she always 
looked at Tubman. There is a special reason for her looking so stylish. She 
has chosen as her calling that of modiste and is the successful proprietor of a 
shop in the most fashionable shopping district of New York. 

Mildren Jennings, who came next, also lives in New York. She has pur- 
sued the same line of work that she began when a Tubman Senior, that is, re- 
form work among the needy classes. Inez added that Mildred has worked a 
wonderful change in the conditions. 

(35) 



Class 'gg MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 

Clifford — no longer Kelly — is assisting Kathrvn Twiggs in her social re- 
form work in Augusta. \o wonder there has been such a revolution in this 
line of work since Kathrvn is devoting her entire time to it, while half of Clif- 
ford's time is claimed by someone else. 

"AVell," said Kathleen Gilciirist, "I have been teaching for seven years, and 
I love the work so much that I intend to continue." Someone whispered that 
the reason is that she's in a co-ed high school. 

We learned that Josie Hall is known and loved by the kindergarten classes 
all over the country througii her nursery and kindergarten songs. She jingles 
quaint little rhymes and sets them to music of her own composition. 

Evelina Mulcay is Augusta's, and even Georgia's, leading spirit for the poli- 
tical advancement of women. Her frequent practice in Miss Woods' classes 
and in Christian Endeavor developed her splendid ability to lecture as she does. 

They say that Bessie Belle Gilchrist as a florist, has put all com])etitors in 
Augusta entirely out of business. She gets large orders from the surrounding 
towns, and even from Atlanta. 

Blanche Harrison is still at Tubman. Don't think, however, that she ha 1 
to stay there, because it's no longer a deep, dark secret that she jilted the 
young man who was so anxious for her to help him "build a sweet little nest 
somewhere in the West." She just prefers to teach. 

Mattie Inglett told us that she has turned her extensive study of chemistry 
and physics to good advantage in scientific farming. "I find the work pleas- 
ant and profitable," she said. AVe all know that she is so famous an authority 
on farming that she now edits "Common Sense Connnent" in The Augusta 
Chronicle. 

We learned that basket ball has been made \i;r\ popular in a large school in 
Florida by Elizabeth Mobley, the physical director. It was stated by the 
principal of that school that no other one thing has so raised the standard of 
the school as has her inviolable rule concerning the scholastic standing of 
pupils who participate in athletics. 

Ruth Miller spoke next. "I"ve been a teacher for the past six years. How- 
ever, just at present, I am reaping a great financial benefit from my new book, 
■"Easy Steps to Latin'." 

Augusta is justly proud of the famous lawyer, Loretta Watson. Her prac- 
tice has become very extensive and since her conscience does not allow her to de- 
fend those whom she knows to be guilty of crime, she has taken Eleanor Walton, 
better known as "Happy," as her assistant, to handle the criminal cases. Thus 
"Happy'' is making good, and it is reported that Loretta is uneasy lest she 
take all her practice. 

We were all glad to know that Elizabeth Carrere is doing well and is a won- 
derful benefit to humanity. Suffering ])eo]jle come to her from far and wide 
because she really practices what she has on her shingle, "Painless Dentistry." 
Probably Elizabeth conceived this idea when she had to visit the dentist so much 
while a Senior at Tubman. 

Pauline Hardin told us that she is now Mrs. ; oh! I can't recall the 

name, but he is the same one who was so attentive ten years ago. I should be 
able to remember that name, for I've seen it quite often in the best magazines 
since Pauline has turned to short story writing in her spare time. 

(36) 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '22 

Thev sav that Ruth Cooj^er has won fame as a cartoonist. 'Twas rumored 
she'd made such a fortune in tliis line that she can truly saj- that she is single 
from choice. 

And, bv the way, if you ever have need of a trained nurse, do not fail to call 
on Virginia Sturman, if you can get her. They say, thougli, she has the re- 
putation of being so capable and reliable that it's almost impossible to get her 
in an emergency. 

Helen Smith told us that she had refused three other invitations in preference 
to the class reunion. She and her private secretary are rushed to death with 
her social obligations, while her husband complains that at times he almost for- 
gets that his wife lives at home. Although Helen has moved back to Pennsyl- 
vania, she loves Augusta so much that she spends her winters at the Bon Air. 

We were not so much surprised when Francis Sherman said, "I am still 
dancing." She has won an international reputation behind the foot-lights, 
especially in her solo dance, "Tiny Toe Twirl." 

Eleanor Lanham is also on the stage, but she holds her audience spell-bound 
with her voice rather than with her feet. She is considered one of the best 
pupils ever produced by the New England Conservatory of IMusic. 

It was learned that anything 3'ou ma3' want in the line of fancy work can be 
obtained from the Siblej' Art Shop on Broad Street. This is onh' one of the 
branches in the chain of stores of which Josephine is proprietor. Her begin- 
ning, like that of so nianv others, was very small — making those lovely collars 
when we were Tubman Juniors. 

The status of movies in general has been almost revolutionized by Annie B. 
Daniel, an actress, who is worshipped by movie fans. No greater good has 
been brought to the public than the high moral standard of the pictures which 
now appear on the screen. Even the preachers are no longer ashamed to be 
jseen at a movie, while Mr. Garrett actually has one at Tubman every week, 
with no trouble whatever in getting a good one. 

Rosabel Burch was the next girl to speak. She is living in Washington 
now, and although her time is taken up with home and family, she still rinds 
leisure for interest in the affairs going on around her. Do you ever hear of a 
great movement or nation-wide drive wiiich is being launched without her help.'' 
Rosabel has the rare talent of being able to do two tilings at once and do them 
both well. 

Eloise Davidson is now living in Colorado. About three years ago she 
married a splendid young man from the West, and went there to make her 
home. "And, do you know,'' she told us, "my chief interest has been changed 
from base ball to my baby. He's just six months old and the chubbiest, dear- 
est, little thing in the world." 

Elizabeth Marsh arose next. "There really isn't very much to tell about 
me," she said. "I've been teaching French at Vassar for the last six years. 
I'm going to stop teaching in a few months foi' — ," she lowered her voice, "you 
see, I'm going to France on my honeymoon.'' 

"Well, to begin with," said Maudelle Wren, as she arose, "I'm matron of 
Lanton Orphanage in Atlanta and I just did succeed in getting here. To be 
frank with you, this is the first time in four years that I've had a vacation. But 
I'm so interested in the work that I've no time left to think of myself." 

(37) 



Class '£2 MAIDS and A MAN Tubjrmn 

Ruli Kitclu'ii was the next to speak. She told us liow, after finisliino- scliool, 
she had become a physical training teacher in a girls' high school out in Mont- 
ana. The work ju.st suits her, she said, and I'm sure it does, for Ruth was just 
cut out for that kind of work. 

^Mildred Gardner, the famous actress, arose next. She is so well known to 
the public that it is hardly worth while to do more than mention her name, for 
everyone knows of her wonderful characterizations. Indeed, it has been chiefly 
through her efforts and her influence that the Shakespearean play has been 
brought to the American .stage. 

Sa})hronia Scott is a trained nurse now, and has been ever since she left 
Tubman. Saphronia told us that although her work was not easy, she felt a 
jjreat deal of satisfaction in being- of some service in this world. 

]\lyrtis Brown and Martha Story are both in New York. They are run- 
ning one of the most exclusive hat shops in the country, and the latest crea- 
tions are always to be seen there. 

The celebrated Countess Orinsky (none other than our old friend Felicia 
Ransey) was the next to speak. She has been living in Russia in the stately 
old castle of Normsby ever since she was married eight years ago. She and the 
count were touring America when she was notified of the banquet, and wishing 
to see once more the scenes of her girlhood, she immediately altered her plans 
and came directly to Augusta. The countess told in an interesting way of a 
few of the most important events of her life. She speaks Russian with ease and 
rapidity, and thinks it much less difficult to acquire than French. 

Mary Henry is a little "school marm'' now. She teaches the third grade 
and is quite a success as is testified by her pupils. "We just love Miss Mary," 
one of the little boys told us enthusiastically the other day. And after all who 
IS a better judge of woman than man.^ 

For the ])ast two years Charlie Mae Scattergood has been lecturing all over 
the country. This field offers many ])ossibilities to one gifted with c;)llo(juial 
talents, and it gives Charlie ]\lae a chance to talk to her heart's content. 

Sara B. Sinnnons, the famous sculjjtress, told us that she had been engaged 
in this work ever since leaving Tubman, but it was only recently that her work 
had been deserving of any merit. One of the girls who knows Sara B. better, 
told us that she is now busy working on a statute of Ex-President Wilson, which 
IS soon to be unveiled. 

Margaret Blitchington, the daring aviatrix, came to the bancjuet from 
Seattle in her ])lane, "The Wind." Margaret held the audience spellbound as 
she tokl of her many adventures and the narrow escapes she had had. 

After leaving Tubman, Eleanor Elliott went on the stage for a few years. 
Her greatest success was in "Little Pal," but just after the public had dis- 
covered her and gone wild over her, she left the stage to become the real "Little 
Pal" of the man she loved. 

Helen Brenner is engaged in research work for the government, and is 
known as one of the ablest scientists of the day. This work particularlv ap- 
peals to Helen, for she is able to gratify to a certain extent her natural curios- 
ity in all things. 

To those who live in Augusta it is needless to say anything of the "Patch- 
work" shop on Jackson Street. This is being run by Miss Eleanor Patch. 
Eleanor's artistic temperament combined with her business ability make this 

(38) 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAX Class '22 

shop what it is. If you want something dainty and indivickial, just stejj 
around tlie corner the next time you are shopping, and visit this toz}' little place. 

Dorothy Bredenberg has — well, not disappointed us, but surprised us, for 
io ! we expected Dot to be a second Charlie Chaplin. But anyhow I'm sure that 
all of the antics that she cut up in school were not for nothing, for Dorothy is 
a missionary to Africa, and surely her powers of persuasion coupled with her 
comedian antics are enough to convert any cannibal. 

Ella Clark lives on a little farm a few miles out of the city, and being 
busy with several small children, Ella scarcely has time to do more than 
raise prize chickens for the Fair. 

"Girls," said Dessie Kuhlke, as she arose, "I want to tell you in just a few- 
words how my life has been spent since I left Tubman. First, I went to col- 
lege, and after I graduated, I married, and ever since, I've been bringing uj) 
the family." 

Josie Milligan spoke next. "I'm still living in Augusta, and I want you to 
come to see me while you are here. I'm just dying to show you our little bung- 
alow. It has the dearest little flower garden in front, but I musn't tell you 
for I want you to come and see for j^ourself." 

Irene Grusin runs the most up-to-date beauty parlor in New York, and her 
own beautiful hair and immaculate person are all the advertising that she 
needs. But hark a moment ! I'm told that as many men go there to be made 
attractive as women. No wonder Irene enjoys her work so much! 

Melville Doughty has made a name for herself as an author. She is also 
the wife of Senator Hardv' of Illinois. Melville was the kind of girl who al- 
ways accomplished what she set out to do. If she had decided to become pre- 
sident of the United States, the fact that the Constitution does not allow a 
woman to hold that position would not have stopped her, but would only have 
added zest to the conquest. 

We were all curious to know the fate of Louise Adams (a quiet little girl 
who never told the class her secrets) especially since we had heard a whisper of 
a June marriage. We expected to hear an account of this wedding, but were 
surprised to hear of a marriage in London, two years back. "But,"' said 
Florence, "I thought you were to be married when school ended." "I was," 
said Louise. "You see, I'm giving an account of my second marriage." 

Edna Agee — but, I suppose, you know her fate, is gym teacher at Tubman, 
and has a "rep" for being the best in the country. In fact, Tubman has not 
lost a game since Edna has been at its head. 

Several of us giggled as Agnes Bohler arose, because we wondered how 
Agnes could paint a true picture of her married life, her good-looking husband, 
her "love nest" of a bungalow, and the sweet phrases she and her husband ex- 
changed. Once, Agnes had liked "them all,'" but one had captured her now. 

Esther Bogoslowsky was the next to tell of her adventures. Esther's eyes 
had a dreamy look that we had not noticed at Tubman. She had succeeded 
Paderewski, had been received at court, and had charmed all with her music ; 
enchanted, we listened to her modest account of her adventures in Europe. 

Alberta Caspary, who was now a distinguished-looking young lad}-, arose 
and started her story. "Gentlemen of the jury," she began with emphasis. 
We all laughed, but Alberta did not see the joke. She was Philadelphia's most 
famous lawyer, and this phrase of address had become a habit. 

(39) 



Class '"2£ MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 

Just as Alberta finislied, a niessonger ran in huiTiedly with a tek'grani for 
•'Miss Watkins." Lucy read the telegram wliieh announced tliat siie had been 
elected mayor, begged us to excuse her as she liad to make a speech, and left. 

Vera McGowan stootl uj), leaned on the table, then straiglitened U}J, giggled, 
and began with her usual "Well." ^V•ra had been a life guard at I'alni Heach. 
A very handsome man — so handsome tiiat ^Vallace Reid and Rudolph Valen- 
tino turned green when they looked at him — fell desj)erately in love with Vera. 
He was a great cliicken executioner, but, somehow, Vera's vampish eyes awed 
liim. Tired of her cruelty, he tried to drown liimself, but Vera saved him. 
When she was bringing him in, he forgot his bashfulness and proj)osed. 

As Vera brought her story to an end, there was a profound silence which 
was finally broken by a familiar voice, hoarse from running. We looked in the 
direction of the auditorium where we saw a little girl whose face still bore the 
signs of make-up that was hurriedly washed off. We recognized Mildred 
O'Neal. "Sorry I couldn't come sooner, ole dears, but I had to wait till my 
part of the performance was over. You see I'm end-man in Field's Minstrels. 
Montine will some later. She has to give a ballet dance in the last act. When 
she is not on the stage, she is running 'Pardue School of Dancing'." 

Suddenly, we noticed that two of our class were absent. What had become 
of Bessie JNIoye and Nonie Mullins .'' 

"Oh," said Marguerite, "I know wiiere Nonie is. Nonie started a great 
career as a grand opera singer. When she played 'Carmen' in Paris, six men 
fell desj)arately in love with her, and when she refused to marry them, they 
committed suicide. Nonie, grieved at being the cause of so much misfortune, 
decided to leave the world and is now a nun." 

"And I've seen Bessie," said J^lorence, "I saw her in Paris, last winter. 
Lillian Skinner, my model, was posing for Diana, when we were interrupted by 
Nichette, my maid, who aimounced 'A young couple from ze Amei'iijue want to 
see ze Mile. Wheete." It was Bessie ! She and her husband had been honey- 
mooning in Venice. Girls, you ought to see Bessie! Her sentiment makes 
Agnes' romantic ideas sound like a conference re])ort ! I have a crow to ])ick 
with Bessie! She raved so much about Venice that Lillian decided to go there 
and now I've lost my chief model and Diana isn't finished." 

Avice Smith — excuse me — I mean Doctor Smith, next told of her thrilling 
experience. Her book "How to Control the Nerves" has been the sensation of 
the times, and Avice informed us that she is head of a sanitarium for the ner- 
vous. She told Edna Davis, Tubman's shorthand teacher, that if during 
exams, any of her pupils should become afflicted with extreme nervousness, to 
advise them to go to Smith Sanitarium. Edna said that she knew of several 
cases, and that it would not be necessary to wait till examination. 

Dora Vlachos told us that she was now ])resident of the Merchant's National 
Bank. We always did think Dora would make a banker; when the girls wanted 
a tuna fish sandwich, they always drew on Dora for a nickel. 

Lucille Steinberg had a dancing school in New York. One night when she 
visited a cabaret, she lost her heart to a blonde dancer. She later found out 
that he was one of her old friends at "Columbia." They married an;l are the 
jnodern "Harlequin and Columbine" of the hippodrome. 

Elese Van Pelt started out to be a sculptor, but lost her lieart to a mis- 
sionary to Hindustan. Elese does not waste hei- great artistic talent : she now 
employs it to design dresses for the "|)()or benighted Hindoos." 

(K)) 



Tnhman MAIDS unci A MAX Class 'M 

Lila Morris had bcon a trained luirsc. A certain young medical student, 
who liad "fallen" for Lila when she was at Tubman, liad finished his course. 
They now had two "dips" apiece; so she decided there was nothing to pi'event 
their marrying. 

TJielma Cannon had married a young naval ott'icer. Bookkeeping short- 
liand, tests, and sucli annoyances were orAy memories now. 

Dorothy Wheeler was still at it. She is bookkeeper for the largest firm in 
Augusta, but she said it is much easier than it v/as at school ; she has had so 
much practice. 

Amelia ]Mohrman was still the same little licart-breaker. Her number of 
victims in the last ten years liad been estimated at about 999,999,000. 

Marguerite Scott was not going to sign for another year at Tubman, for 
she had won the championship in pitching, and had signed up with the "Tigers." 

Esther Lichtenstein liad been a trained nurse at a hospital in Augusta, but 
had been discharged on the grounds that all patients had to undergo a second 
operation for broken stitches caused by too loud laughing which Esther's jokes 
brought forth. 

As for Elizabeth Mathews, "wonders will never cease," for Elizabeth is 
a chemistry teacher, and the experience that she got at Tubman lias, no doubt, 
gone far toward making her an expert instructor. 

As many of the music lovers of this country have been charmed by the music 
of Myrtle Churchill, it will be of interest to them to know that this talented 
young woman is a graduate of the class of 1922. 

After washing dishes for nine years. Comer Phillips made a fortune which 
she has spent on permanent waves. Now she can step forth in the "rainyest" 
kind of weather. 

Frances Matthews is the author of the famous treatise on "How to Conquer 
Forgetfulneis.' In this, she advises students who suffer from a deficiency of 
brains, to order two sets of school books. In this way they may obtain a dis- 
count, and after the first book has strayed, there is tlie duplicate to rely upon ! 

Edna Hutchinson, last and least of the class, is a confirmed old maid with 
no possible hope of being otherwise. She still has day di*eams, draws house 
plans, and imagines that she will some day be a greater architect. 

Of this class of seventy-eight girls, there's not one who hasn't done some- 
thing in her small way to push the world and civilzation onward. There are 
those who still aspire some day to become president of the l.^nited States, or Mr. 
Garrett's successor, or housekeeper for some lonely and wealthy old baclielor, 
or traffic cop at Broad and Eighth. But for the time, we laid aside our aspi- 
rations and the relating of our achievements to conclude the glorious reunion 
by joining in singing "Auld Lang Syne." 

— Edxa HrxcHixsoN. 
— Fraxces Matthews. 
— Comer Phillips. 



(41) 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



Last Will and Testament 



Mary Gidsox Hexry 

^T^E, the Class of 1922, liaving acquired much useless knowledge and being 
\Xy in possession of many qualities which wc tiiink are not desirable to retain 
after our graduation from this notable institution, and being non compos 
iiu'iitis and indisposed to give away anytliing wortli wliile, be(jueath to the per- 
sons hereinafter named the following items : 

1. To Doris Speth, Josie Hall leaves her keen sense of humor, hoping 
Doris will now be able to appreciate jokes which any of her teachers or class- 
mates are able to originate. 

2. To Cecelia Baker, Eleanor Walton leaves iier ])ower of argumentation. 

3. To Kdna Taliaferro, Elizabeth Carrere wills her unused excuses, hop- 
ing the aforenamed person will not have to work overtime preparing new ones. 

4. To Hazel Leary, Frances Matthews leaves her ;il)ility to ask foolish 
questions and, thereby, take all the teacher's time. 

5. To Elma Keener, Bessie Belle Gilchrist leaves her always audible voice 
so that the said legatee will not waste time and breath by having to repeat. 

G. To Florence Lester, ^lildred Gardner leaves her brilliancy in the class- 
room, esjiecially on cloudy days. 

7. To Bessie Rosanblatt, Marguerite Scott wills her "permanent" wave. 

8. To Sarah Wyly, Comer l'hilli])s leaves hei- beautiful ]>emiianslii)). 

9. To Henrietta Dunn, Lucile Steinberg leaves her ability as an orator. 

10. To Grace Strauss, Margaret Blitchington lea\es her height, ho])ing 
the elongation will not detract from her Grace. 

11. To Helen MacMurphy, Dorothy Bredenberg leaves her two "l)ig- 
tails" which she has kej)t for many years, and now, as she completes her course, 
wishes to dispose of. 

12. To I>oulse Dicks, Elizabeth Marsh gives her seat in the auditorium, 
hoping it will be well cared for and used for many years to come. 

13. To any Junior who is in need of them, Helen Smith leaves the words, 
"I forgot to study." 

l-i. To Miss Hains, the Senior Class leaves one perfect translation of 
''D'ooges' Latin for Beginners,"' to assist her in coi'recting exercises written 
by F'reshmen. 

(12) 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '2£ 

15. To Miss FHsch, the Pliysics Class bequeaths a new chissroom, wliorc 
no sudden sounds nor disconcerting noises will be heard. 

16. To Miss Hamilton, the Senior Class gives one stick of peppermint 
candy, twelve inches in length and three-eighths of an inch in diameter, to be 
used for lunch when her supply of pencils is exhausted. 

17. To Miss Page, Senior A bequeaths their French pronunciation, which 
she in turn will bestow on any class that she deems worthy of such a gift. 

18. To Miss Comej', we leave one year's supply of "Secretary's Reports," 
guaranteed to be worded alike in every respect. 

19. To Miss Briscoe, Josie Milligan leaves her sweater, so that Miss 
Briscoe will have a different sweater for every day of the month instead of 
only twenty-nine. 

(Signed) Senior Class or Nineteen-Twenty-Two. 

Witnesses : 

Charlie Mae Scattergood. 
Elinor Elliott. 
Annie B. Daniel. 



(43) 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



To A. R. C. 



Hail to the Academy, strong and bold, 
The stalwart youths that thrill our soul. 
Hail to the bovs who the cigarettes scorn 
Like the famous George Washington born. 

Hail to the bovs wlio never swear, 
AVhose code of morals is fair and square. 
Who are up at six and in by nine. 
And as for school they're always on time. 

Hail to the football above reproach. 
Hail to the boys who love their coach. 
The boys whose spirit makes them win, 
Who always meet you with a grin. 

Hail to the boys so full of "pep," 

They always, always march in step. 

Who to break their word would never stoop. 

Even though it brought tiieni a Ford "coupe. 

Hail to the Glee Chib and Jasper fair. 
They are the best, so fine, so rare. 
When on their trip to Langley swell. 
They turned out school and rang the bell. 

Hail, all hail to the Academy, 
To you fine boys we sing. 



-Eleanor L.\nham, '22. 



{U) 




TUBMAN'S HERO 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN 'Vnhi 



Farewell to Seniors 



Tlie doors of Tubman stand ajar — 
"Wliat for?'' "Home," one may say; 

"The Seniors are going to leave us, 
'Tis Graduation Day !" 

At last, fair Seniors, you've run your mile. 

Your goal is 'most in view — 
But struggle on to fame and glory, 

Sliow the world what you can do. 

Now the girls who bear the burden 

Brighten up as they see you. 
For they know that you will iielp them. 

And your duty you will do. 

And, although the world awaits you, 

Holding forth its treasures fair, 
Teach it what you've learned at Tubman, 

Show it how to do and dare. 

Then here's to the class that's full of pluck 

And ever ready to do, 
AVith hearts all high we'll give a cheer 

For the class of "twenty-two !" 

Elxor.^ Bexxett, '23. 



(46) 



_. A 




JUMIOR 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '22 



Junior Class 



Colors — Kwl and ^Vhite Flowers — Rud Poppv 

Motto — To do, not to dream; to be, not to seem. 

CLASS OFFICERS 

Cecilia Baker President 

AxABEL Powell .Vice-President 

Janie Tommixs — Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 



Alexander 

Allen 

Armstrong 

Baker 

Barchen 

Bennett 

Brown 

Bcvd 

Burdell 

Cadle 

Cohen 

Connor 

Crenshaw 

Davis 

Dicks 

Dunn, H. 

Dunn, M. 

Egbert 

Etheridge 

Evans 

Ford 

Franklin 

Funk 

Gary 

Gibbs 

Goodyear 

Grusin 

Gunter 

Harris 

Heath, E. 

Heath, M. 

Hill, j\Iartha 

Hill, Mildred 



Hilton 

Holden 

Hohnan, L. 

Holman, 'Si. 

Hutcheson 

Johnson 

Jones, M. E. 

Jones, M. B. 

Jones, S. 

Jordan 

Keener 

Kreisberg 

Leary 

Lee 

Lehman 

Lester 

Logan 

Lombard 

Malone 

Matheny 

McGaliee 

McjNIurphy 

Merritt, A. 

Merritt, C. 

Miller 

Montgomery 

]Moore, D. 

Moore, S. 

Murphy 

Xorris 

Otwell 

Panknin 

Papageorge 



Petrea 

Phillips 

Plumb 

Plunkett 

Powell, A. 

Powell, L. 

Probvn 

Radciiffe 

Rosenblatt 

Sandler 

Seigler 

Sevier 

Smith 

Speth 

Strauss, E. 

Strauss, G. 

Taliaferro 

Tant 

Theiling 

Tillman 

Tommins 

AVall 

Walton, F. 

Walton, P. 

^Veeks 

Wcscoat 

Wicker 

Wolfe 

Woodburv 

Wright, B. 

Wright, M. 

Wyly 

Youmans 



(49) 



Class '2'2 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



A Junior's Opinion of a Senior 



OU ask niu, "What is a Juniors opinion of a Senior?" Well, on the 
whole, we are getting out of that stage in which we adore them from 
afar ! When we were Subs or Freshmen, to be a Senior seemed the very 
pinnacle of success and the height of our ambition ! 

There is an old saying, "Hitch your wagon to a star," and someone has 
quite appropriately added, "Hang on tight and there you are!" This seems 
to apply to us very well, for we have hitched our wagons to the Senior Star, 
and now we are almost there. However, contrary to the principles of astro- 
nomy, the closer we are, the smaller the star seems, so we are not as "thrilled" 
as we thought we should be. 

I once saw a cartoon which fits us exactly. It was the Evolution of a 
Dollar. The first jjicture was a small child's idea of a dollar; it was as big 
as a millstone! The second was a boy of about twelve; the dollar had shrunk 
to the size of a ])umpkin. The third was a young man who had just started 
earning his living; the dollar was smaller still and only the size of a plate. The 
last picture was of an old man, rich and deadv to stop his race after money. 
The dollar was so tiny that it was hariUy able to be noticed except in connec- 
tion witii a great many others. The Seniors have shrunk thus before our eyes 
and now we are almost looking at them as equals and not our superiors ! 

Of course we are impatient to take their j)laces, and we envv them with all 
our hearts when graduation week comes round and we see them in their glory, 
but we don't envy them their piles of studies ! Wiien we see the proud Seniors 
receiving their diplomas, we gasp with envy, but then we think, "Oh, well, don't 
worry ; we'll soon be receiving ours !" Thus, we shake off a luring fear that 
maybe — oil ! maybe we siiall flunk and not win the coveted diploma next year. 

Well, anyway, we feel for the Seniors in their troubles and rejoice with tiiem 
in their triumphs, and on the wiiole love them (and their position) dearly! 

— YiRGiNiA L. Sevier, '23. 



(50) 



£i 








Tub man 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class "k 



Sophomore Class 



Class Colors — Blue and White Class Flower- 

Motto — We will find a wav or make one. 



-Sweet Pea 



CLASS OFFICERS 

DoKOTHY Pi'XD - President 

Elizabeth Keeps Vice-President 

Elizabeth Dowling ...Secretary 





MEMBERS 




Alexander 


Fortson 


McDaniel 


Sawilosky 


Allen 


Frazer 


McElmurray 


Schaufele 


Anderson 


Greene 


McEwen 


Schumacher 


Andrews 


Green 


Meads 


Silvey 


Angelakos 


Guy 


IMerry 


Simowitz 


Ballentine 


Hardin 


Mertins 


Simjjson 


Balk 


Heath 


Meyer 


Sims 


Baxley 


Hersey 


Miller 


Smith 


Belding 


Hill 


Mintz 


Smith 


Elitchington 


Hinton, E. 


Mobley 


Spradley 


Br add 


Hinton, R. 


Moore 


Steed 


Brawner 


Hitt 


Morgan, L. 


Swindell 


Briscoe 


Hixon, 0. 


Morgan, M. 


Svlvester 


Brooks 


Hixon, I. 


Morris, E. 


Tabb 


Buck 


Hogan 


Morris, M. 


Tanenbaum 


Burgamy 


Howell 


Morris, M. M. 


Tliompson 


Cain 


Hughes 


Munday 


Tobv 


Campbell 


Jackson 


Murphy 


Tooie 


Carroll 


Jenkins 


Murray 


Tunkle 


Carswell 


Johnson 


Oliver 


Tyler 


Chancey 


Jordan 


Page 


Vaughn 


Chapman 


Kahrs 


Palmer 


Waterhouse 


Crawford 


Keen 


Peebles 


Weltch 


Criswell 


Kleiner 


Perkins 


Whaley 


Dowling, E. 


Kreps 


Plumb 


White,. C. 


Dowling, S. 


Langston 


Ponds, D. 


White, L. 


Durden 


Lawrence, A. 


Ponds, L. 


Whitlock 


Dye 


Lawrence, R. 


Fund 


Wilder 


Elliot, A. 


Leary 


Quinn 


Wilhelm 


Elliot, E. 


Lee 


Redding 


Winkler 




Levy 


Reese 




Evans, D. 


Lockhart 


Rheney 


Wren 


Evans, H. 


Marks 


Ridlehoover 


Young 


Florence 


Martin 


Rosenthal 


Zealy 



(53) 



Class '£ii MAIDS and A MAX Tiibi 



The First of a Great Line 



>^-/HE Class of '24 claims tliu honor all for itself of having been the first 
^^^ t'lass of memorable "Subs" to enter tiie noble edifice of learning. Tubman. 
The name of "babies" was quickly applied to us, and we were the joke of 
the school. Our ignorance and innocence jjrovoked laughter wherever we 
chanced to go. There were many things for us to wonder at, the seniors with 
their learned mien and sedate ways ; the mixture of languages ; the greatness of 
Mr. Garrett of whom we stood in awe, and all the lights of knowledge which were 
dawning. But in the course of our years of study and toil since we are now 
"wise fools," we have learned many things. As freshmen we learned that "lab." 
was not a playroom full of toys ; the bannisters were not to slide down ; 
that geometry was not an animal ; neither was the stairway of marble. As we 
are now sophomores we have added greatly to our knowledge, and increased in 
fame, and we are known far and wide as the only sophomores class whose glory 
has not been dinnned by tiiat of the juniors, and are heard in all things (thanks 
to our yelling capacities). But we hope that when all lionor and glory is ours 
and the top of the ladder is reached, we will be famed in more and nobler ways 
than yelling. 

— Sarah Riddlehooveu, '2-1. 



(Si) 



f 




L 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '£2 



Freshman Clas; 



Colors — Purple and Gold' 

Motto — Throuo-li tiic Dust to the Stars 



Fiercer — Paiisv 



CLASS OFFICERS 

Edna Reynolds .— President 

Katherixe Wiggins : .Vice-President 

Mary Ivirkland Secretary and Treasurer 







MEMBERS 






Abnett 


Danforth 


Holden 


Newhall 


Sawilowsky 


Adams, E. 


Davis 


Holley 


Norrell 


Scarborough 


Adams, K. 


DesCombes 


Holmes 


Norris 


Schwitzerlet 


Andrews, L. 


Dorn 


Hughes 


North 


Scruggs 


Andrews, ^I. 


Downing 


Ihrig 


O'Connor 


Sedwick 


Andrews, R. 


Edmunds 


Inman 


O'Neal 


Seigler 


Arnold 


Edwards, G. 


Irvin 


Otis 


Senn 


Ashendorf 


Edwards, M. 


Jack 


Owens, C. 


Serotta 


Babbitt 


Elgin 


Jones 


Owens, Mar. 


Sheppard 


Baxlev 


Fell 


Johnson, M. 


Owens, Mil. 


Skinner 


Beale" 


Fendlev 


Johnson, R. 


Panknin 


Smith, B. 


Bell, D. 


Fletcher 


Kirkland, M. 


Parks 


Smith, D. 


Bell, V. 


Franklin 


Kirkland, R. 


Patch 


Spann 


Best 


Frederick 


Lamb 


Pearl 


Sjaaulding 


Branch 


Friedman 


Lamback 


Perkins 


Spires 


Brown, A. 


Fuller, F. 


Lanford 


Peterson 


Steed 


Brown, E. 


Fuller, G. 


Lass 


Phillips, E. 


Steinberg 


Brown, L. 


Fuller,?. 


Latimer 


Philips, H. 


Story 


Bouterse 


Gatchel 


Lester 


Piatt 


Summers 


Bovce 


Glover 


jMagruder 


Powell 


Swain 


Bothwell 


Gordon 


Matheny 


Printup 


S3'kes 


Burch 


Goolsby 


Mathewes 


Rabun 


Vaughn 


Burnette 


Green 


McElmurray, B. 


Reab 


Wall 


Burner 


Greene 


McElmurray, M. 


Reid 


Ward 


Bush " 


Grossman 


McElmurray, Mil 


Reeves 


Wells 


Butler 


Hall 


Menger 


Reynolds 


Wescoat 


Cannon 


Hamilton 


Middleton 


Ripley 


Wiggins 


Cartledge 


Hawkins 


Miller 


Roseman 


Wilkerson 


Cook 


Heath 


Mills 


Rosier 


Williams 


Crenshaw 








Winter 


Culpepper, Mar. 


Helm 


Moye 


Sacre 


Whitlock 


Culpepper, Mer. 


Henry 


Murphy, G. 


S amnions 


White 


Culver 


Hill 


Murphy, V. 


Saunders- 


Woodall 



(57) 



Class '%'2 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



To the Freshman Class 



(With apologies to Sam W. Foss) 

lA't iiiu go to the school called the Tubman High, 

That faces on Walton Way, 
Where the maids who'd be wise and the maids who would shine 

Go trudging day by day. 

I would not yet be a Senior sweet, 

Nor a Junior important and gay ; 
I would not be a Sophomore wise. 

Nor sigh for Sub-Freshman days. 

But here's to the class of '25 
The Freshman of "22. 

— Martha Lester. 



(58) 




SUB-FRESH 




. I 




I 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class 'S3 



Sub-Freshman Class 



Class Colors — Pink and White Class Floicers — Pink Rose-bud 

Motto— One for All, and All for One. 

OFFICERS 

Mildred Garrett ........President 

Clemjiie Dowxixg - Vice-President 

WiLJiiXA Rowland - Secretary 

Sue Plukkett Treasurer 



Aldrich 

Anderson 

Armstrong 

Averette 

Bannester 

Barton, L. 

Barton, R. 

Barrow 

Bassford 

Beavers, M. 

Bell, S. 

Bell, H. 

Benson 

Bishop 

Bland 

Blackstone 

Bolin, M. 

Bolin, E. 

Bouterse 

Boyd 

Brawner 

Brazelle 

Brooks 

Broom 

Brown 

Burton 

Carswell 

Cauthen 

Chew 

Clarke 

Clary 

Corbett 

Crawford 

Crenshaw 





MEMBERS 




Cullcy 


Haslett 


O'Conner 


Currie 


Hattawav 


Oliver 


Curry 


Heath 


Parker 


Daly 


Holley 


Parks 


D'Antignac 
Darfin 


Hooper 
Hoppman 


Pate 
Perkins 


Davidson 


Howard 


Philips 


Davis 


Hughes . 


Plunkett 


Dicks, D. 


Hutcheson 


Powell 


Dicks, H. 


James 


Power 


Dykes 


Johnson, F. 


Randall 


Downing 


Johnson, R. 


Reese 


Dye 


Jones, El. 


Reid 


Ellison 


Jones, Ed. 


Rist 


Finklestein, I. 


Joplin 


Rhodes 


Finklestein, R. 


Kelly, Lois 


Rogers 


Fennell, M. 


KellV, Lil. 


Rowland 


Fennell, H. 


Klimt 


Satcher 


Fiske 


Kneece 


Sawilowsk^ 


Fleming, V. 
Fleming, M. 


Koger 
Lawrence 


Schaufele 
Schneider 


Ford, A. 


Lombard 


Scott 


Ford, M. 


Luckey 


Seigler 


Garner 


JNIatheny 


Sellears 


Garrett 

Gilchrist 


McElmurray 
McCarty 


Sharpe 
Shealey 
Shellhouse 
Shimoff 


Green, C. 
Green, M. 
Gunn 


McDaniel 
McEwen 

Miles 


Guthrie 


Miller 


Shivers 


Hair 


Morgan 


Simons 


Hall, U. 
Hall, D. 
Hardman 


Morris 
]\Ioye 
jMurrah 
Neary 


Smith, Ev. 
Smith, L. 
Smith, J. 


Harper 


Norris 


-Smith, El. 



Spradle}^ 

Steed, H. 

Steed, D. 

Steinberg 

Stoniker 

Stowers 

Summer 

Summerall 

Tanenbaum 

Thompson, A 

Thompson, L 

Tinley 

Tommins 

Trigg 

Trowbridge 

Turner, A. 

Turner, M. 

Vlachos 

Wallace 

Walton 

Walker 

Warner 

Waterhouse 

Watkins 

Weigle 

Whitaker 

Whitaker 

Widener 

Wilcox 

Wilensky 

Wilcnsky 

Wilhitc 

Williams 

Wolfe 

Wright 



B. 
W. 



J. 
M. 



(61) 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAX Tubman 



Life's Lesson 



(From James Whitcomb RiloyVs "There! Little Girl, Don't Crv!") 

1. 

There ! little girl, don't cry ! 
They have broken your slate, I know ; 
And your speller blue. 
And your geography, too. 
Are things of the long ago ; 

But grammar school troubles will soon pass by. 
There ! little girl, don't cry ! 

II. 

There! little girl, don't cr^ ! 
They have put you in Sub-Fresh, I know, 
And the sweet easy ways 
Of your rithmetic days 
Are things of the long ago; 
But Latin and history will soon go by — 
There ! little girl, don't cry ! 

III. 

There ! little girl, don't cry ! 
You've begun algebra, I know. 
And the golden gleams 
Of your reading book dreams 
Arc things of the long ago. 
Sub-Fresh holds all that your brain need try. 
Tliere ! little girl, don't cry I 

— Jean Davidson, '2.5. 



(62) 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class "ii2 



Tubman High, My Tubman High! 



Thy students throng thro' all thy halls, 
Tubman High, my Tubman High ! 

Thy teachers filled with fervor all 

Tubman High, my Tubman High ! 

Thy athletes star on every floor, 

Their deeds of valor all adore, 

Their prowess opens every door 

To Tubman High, my Tubman High ! 

Thy head shall never bow in shame,.. 

Tubman High, my Tubman High ! 
Thy daughters will preserve thy fame, 

Tubman High, my Tubman High ! 
Let Nealy's memory never rust 
Remember Garrett's sacred trust, 
And all thy teachers, true and just, 

Tubman High, my Tubman High ! 

Thy past with glory flames afar. 

Tubman High, my Tubman High! 

Thy present we must never wear. 

Tubman High, my Tubman High ! 

Thy future be our dearest pride 

Nor may we ever lay aside 

Our hopes, our aims for ought beside 
Tubman High, my Tubman High ! 

— Margaret Johnson. 



(63) 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAX Class '£'2 



Exempts 



The picture on the opposite page shows the girls who were exempt from 
all Mid- Year Examinations in February, 1922. To be exempt from an Exam- 
ination in an_v subject a student must have made a Term Average of B plus or 
hig'her. To be exempt in all subjects indicates a very high standing. The 
following girls were exemjjt : 

SENIOR CLASS : Anna Elizabeth Branch, Mildred Gardner, Bessie Gilchrist, 
Mary Henry, Mattie Inglett, Dessie Kuhlkc, Eleanor Walton, Lucy 
AVatkins. 

JUNIOR CLASS : Janelle Gibbs, Grace Strauss. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS : jVIarion Andrews, Mary Briscoe, Ruth Hardin, Ivy 
Hixson, Margaret Lockhart, Dorothy Levy, Catherine Schumacher, Jennie 
Claire Steed, Sarah Tanenbaum, Lucile Whitlock. 

FRESHMAN CLASS : Rebecca Andrews, Catherine Branch, Eleanor Brown, 
Ruth Green, Luch Goodrich Henry, Martha Lester, Gladys Miller, Susie 
Quinn, Edna Reynolds, Ida Wall, Marguerite Westcoat. 

SUB-FRESHMAN CLASS : Clemmie Downing, Helen Fennell, Mary Fiske, 
Langhorne Howard, Lois Kelly, Evelyn McDaniel, Mena Neary, Wilmina 
Rowland, Estelle Sawilowsky, Elizabeth Warner. 



(65) 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



Cosmetics 



English class is an awful bore, 
When reading some of Tennyson's lore, 
Still she could even bore us more 
But for Cosmetics. 

In history it is on the sly 
That one must pencil a watchful eve, 
Still we must do it or die. 
With Cosmetics. 

"Will you pardon me, if I remark, 
Cosmetics leave me in the dark," 
Said our French teacher lowering our mark 
About Cosmetics. 

In chemistry it's a different thing 
Why one can even a dorin sling 
AVhen from across the room some one sings, 
"Pass the Cosmetics." 

For the moral of this, girls, don't think. 
If you would capture that foppish "gink,'" 
And when you have him at the kitchen snik, 
Thank Cosmetics. 

— Eleanor Laxham. 



(66) 



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Tiihman MAIDS and A MAX Cla 



Honor League "Truth" 



In all this glory, of earth and above, 
We praise and we worship our God of Love, 
Who lived and died on earth for men. 
That He, His faith 'gainst foes defend 
With Truth. 

The world's great wheel of wealth and fame, 
The minds from whence it grew and came, 
The humanity and the love of things ; 
Nature's joy forever rings 
With Truth. 

Knowledge is the body whole, 
But wisdom is the very soul ! 
Do not fear, and shrink away. 
But live each happy, gladsome day 
With Trutli. 

The spirit of our Tubman High 
Shall spread from earth up to tiie sky. 
Our search shall last unto the end, 
lentil our knowledge and wisdom blend 
With Truth. 

— Melville Burdelle DorcHTY, '22. 



(69) 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN Tub) 



Confessions of a Tubmanite 



XHAVE always been most envious of tlic authors of "Confessions of a 
Wife" and of a "Movie Star," and have greatly looked forward to the 
time wiien I siiould write some. I shall tell some of my thoughts since I 
left care-free childhood behind and entered the massive portals of the Tubman 
High School. I shall jjass over the first three years of my career, a veritable 
nightmare in which I was pursued by horrible Latin exams and daily algebra 
tests, and devote my time to this last, my Senior year. 

I wonder if people who write and talk of Senior jirivileges really believe 
that there are such things? Wliat a disapjiointment it is to anticij)ate for 
years the time when Mr. Garrett will "want to see the Senior Class innnediately 
after assembly," only to find tiiat when you are a Senior he has talked out. 
One might say we can "lord it" over the under classmen, but when a sub rushes 
up to you and says:"I'o?/ might be in my class, do you know where Sub E is 
now.''" — where is our Senior sujieriority .f* 

Lots of things have been puzzling me ever so long. Does Miss Flisch know 
of our fervent ])rayers in history class when she springs "big question," and 
does Mile. Page guess how mucii of her French we understand? Gee! but I 
'most got caught eating in the building today, but what does it matter, to- 
morrow's Saturday. 

Oh ! what a heavenly week-end — parties, dances and — .just everything Week 
ends are grand wiiile they last, but when they are over, how dull and prosaic 
school seems! Miss West did try to give us a bit of excitement by s])ringing 
a chemistry test today — she'll be the one to get the excitement when she sees 
our papers. 

Had the best time in Englisii today — imagine it ! Was a "laboratory 
period," and we were working on our short stories. I heard all about one of 
our esteemed teacher's ])ast love affair from the girl in front. Vou can imagine 
the pathos of it all, for the lover i.i dead now and sjie is still an old maid. But 
that's not all — I heard more delicious scandal from across the aisle. I was 
so surprised! I wonder if tiie reports are true? They can't be, but, yet 

Without a doubt, afternoon chemistry is — welt, any way, it isn't nmch fun. 
One of these days, when I've the authority, I'm going to change the Senior B 
schedule. Afternoon lab is bad enough all the time, but when you are making 
chlorine and the apparatus "busts,' it's awful ! ^Yhen I went to the window 
to get some air, and thus ])revent instant death by asphyxiation, whom should 
I see but — well, a machine. Isn't it tough to have to stay in school and smell 

(70) 



Tubman JMAIDS and A MAX Class 'gg 

chlorine wlien someone is waiting' for you outside? School certainly lias ruined 
my complexion, and I wanted to look to good ! But I didn't put any rouge on. 
I'm not that kind of a girl, and, besides, mother might have noticed it wlien 
I got home. 

Today is Wednesday and we had the first meeting of the Annual staff. 
Wouldn't take anything for being "on," 'cause you hear more gossip, and be- 
sides I might be a subject for discussion if I weren't present. Can hardly wait 
a week for the next meeting — Annuals are gobs of fun even if you do have to 
work yourself to death and make announcements before the whole school. I 
didn't know there were so man^' girls in school 'till I said my little say this 
morning. 

Another glorious week-end — The Shiek was here ! We all went down Friday 
afternoon and again Saturday morning, and stayed 'most all day. Oh ! but it 
was bliss ! Who would have ever thought that a Shiek could be so positively 
fascinating.'' But he was. Ask any one of his devotees how well he handles a 
situation. 

Had the most harrowing experience in the lunch room today. As usual, 
there were so many girls down there that you couldn't move. After fighting 
for hours, or so it seemed, to get my ice cream, I had just recovered my breath 
and was beginning to enjoy life when — I w-asn't eating my own cone at all, but 
— horrors ! — a dirty little Sub's ! 

Tomorrow is Lee's birthday, which means a half-holiday. We were all 
hoping to get out of two whole periods, but Mr. Garrett is going to cut to thirty 
minute periods and have them all. Isn't that just like a man ! I wonder if 
Lee ever guessed how much joy he would bring into the lives of school girls.'' 
He has given humanity quite a few hours of holiday since he died, hasn't he.'' 
Lee certainly was a great man ! 

Unmitigated anguish ! Exams are coming soon — next week, in fact — but, 
then, so is June ; some day, and mayhe we'll all get our diplomas. 

— Eleaxor Waltox, '22. 



(71) 



Chfts 'gg MAIDS and A MAN Tubi 



Chemistry 

OR 
AN UNANSWERED PRAYER 



(Tunc: Sunny TLiinosseo) 

Oh, I've got an exam, sucli a luird exam, 
In good ole chemistry ; 

I couldn't pass it if I tried. 

Seems as thougli my brains just died. 
Oh, I wisii I'd studied, liow I wislied I'd studied 
That darned ole chemistry; 

I'd be playing basket ball. 

Instead of studying in the hall. 
Oh, I'm out of breath, just scared to death, 
'Bout the dinged ole chemistry; 
All I see is H2O plus H2SO4 — 

Oh, Lordy, hear my plea. 

Let me pass my chemistry. 
And I'll be exempt like I want to he 
In nineteen twenty-tliree. 

— Eleaxoh IvAxmam, ''22. 



(72) 




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Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class 'i 



Just By Chance 



a 



ACK HOLMES liad been in New York just three days, but lie had already 
reached the conclusion that instead of bein^ a lively place, it was really 
quite dull and uninteresting. 



AVhen one looked at Jack, his browned skin suggested great prairies, with 
the sun beating down and the winds sweeping over them, and his deep blue eyes 
seemed to inform one that they really had that kind of sky out there instead 
of the pale, smoky one which covered New York. 

These thoughts ran vaguely through the little stenographer's mind as she 
rode up in the elevator, with this six-foot monster, to her office. Jack, turn- 
ing around, saw the pretty little blond's eyes on him, and because he felt very 
lonesome, he spoke to her and she smiled sweetly at him. 

Of course, it just happened that when Jack saw her get off at the tenth 
floor and enter a lawyer's office, he immediately remembered that he must see 
a lawyer about some stock of his. Again it just chanced that the little steno- 
grapher opened the door for him, and he was allowed a few minutes conversa- 
tion with her. 

During the following few days. Jack found that he was obliged to return to 
this office quite often to see about his stock, and a friendship soon sprang up 
between Edith Johnson, the stenographer, and himself. One day when he was 
feeling lonesome and blue, he asked Edith to go out to luncheon with him and 
later they used some theater tickets which he happened to have. 

Then, Jack suddenly awoke to the fact that he was wildly in love with the 
blue-eyed enchantress and being a rough Westerner, he didn't spend months 
approaching the question in a diplomatic way, but blurted it out in an inco- 
herent style. That Edith understood, however, and wasn't wholly displeased 
was shown by the flush which deepened in her cheek and the sparkle that made 
her eyes radiant. 

"I believe you're the loveliest creature that ever existed," exclaimed Jack, 
a few days later, as they were walking tlirough the park and he, as usual, was 
gazing at her pink and white complexion and star-like eyes fringed with dark 
lashes. 

Just then they passed a girl to whom Edith spoke very pleasantly. Afte/ 
they had gone a little way, Jack said: "She's not a friend of yours, is she.^"' 

"Yes, I am very fond of her," answered Edith. 

"But she is painted !" from Jack, in a surprised voice. 

(75) 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN Tub man 

Edith became quiet and listened in silence while Jack proceeded to expound 
his views on the made-up girl. Finally, in a very timid voice she ventured: "If 
a man loved a girl, would he forgive iier for doing something that he thought 
verv wrong, if she jiromised never to do it again r' 

"If he cares for the girl as much as I care for you, he would forgive," he 
answered. 

The subject was soon changed, for Jack had received a telegram that he 
must go home on the following day and he wanted to take Edith with him, to 
show her to his motJier. Finally, he won and Edith promised to go with him. 

Accordingly, tlie next afternoon about two o'clock the door-bell rang and 
Edith went to the door to admit her future husband. 

''Is Miss John wliy, Edith, are you ill.'"' he cried as he gazed at her 

pale cheeks. 

■'No, but I had a confession to make and thought I'd better do it in this 
way. You know you said you'd forgive and," as he looked into her eyes, "you 
see, blue eyes look so nmch better with dark lashes." 

■'They surely do,'' he involuntarily agreed. 

"Oh ! I know vou don't love me now that you see I'm not really pretty," and 
poor Edith buried her head in her hands and wet the straight wisps of hair, 
which were falling around her face, with her tears. 

But Jack, recovering from his first astonislimcnt, came over to her, and 
took her in his arm?, assuring her that he loved her as much as ever. Finally, 
her sobbing ceased and then Jack said: "Come, honey, we must hurry, if we are 
to catch th.at train,'* and then glancing at her, "How long would it take you 
TO curl your hair and — er — make up.'"' 

•'About thirty minutes," she dimjilcd back. 

■'Well, I guess we can wait that long." 

— Hellen M. Smith, '22. 



(T(i) 



^r 



Class '£"2 MAIDS and A MAN Tubi 



Plays at Tubman 



^^-/HERE have been many cliarniing plays given at Tubman during the past 
^L^ V year and several others have been scheduled, all of which have brought 
out the talent and ability of tiie Tubman girls. Tubman has always 
prided itself on the successful and delightful ])lays it has presented. This 
year's entertainments have been more numerous than usual, and, if possible, 
liave given even greater pleasure. 

Beginning with the Atliletic Exiiibition, presented under the direction of 
Miss Briscoe and Miss Plunkett, tiie school as a wiiole showed excellent results 
both of training and effort. "Tubmapolitan Art," presented by the College 
Club, was an artistic triumph. No where could be found a more perfect re- 
presentation of both the old and new art of sculpture than that pictured by the 
beautiful girls wiio took tiiese parts. 

An amusing little comedy, "A Perplexing Situation," ])resented by Miss 
Hains with the assistance of a number of Tubman girls, gave splendid amuse- 
ment to an aj)preciative audience. 

This was followed by "Mr. Bob," under the auspices of the College Club. 
This play iiad the distinction of iiaving the cast, not only of Tubman girls, but 
also one of the Tubman faculty and some Academy boys. Needless to say this 
play was a "hit." 

Nearlv every Friday afternoon the school is entertained by plays given by 
the Eureka Club — plays that are ratiier spontaneous comedy and no end of fun. 

There are two plays to wiiich the school is looking forward. Tiie first of 
these is "The Charm School," which the Senior Class is preparing and it pro- 
mises to out-do all former Senior efforts. This will be followed by the Junior 
play, "The Yokahama Maid." Its tuneful score and its interesting plot will 
undoubtedly be the climax to all the former Junior plays at Tubman. 

— Florexce Lester, '23. 



(78) 



Tiihwan MAIDS and A xMAN Class ''2'2 



The Charm School 



^^=^HE following is a synopsis of "The Charm School," which is to be pre- 
^^^ sented by the Senior Class on April 21st. 

Austin Bevans is an automobile salesman with ideas, who inherits a finish- 
ing school for girls. True to his form he has an idea and decides to take 
active control of the school and teach his pupils the secret of charm. With 
hero-like ability he surmounts the main obstacle, lack of funds, by securing the 
financial support of Homer Jones on the condition that none of the students 
fall in love with the new principal. 

Now what "Greek God" could help being attractive to girls especially in 
a girls' seminary.'' The Apollo in question was no exception to the rule, for 
every one became infatuated with him, from the most insignificant fi'eshman to 
the president of the senior class, Elise Benedotti, niece of Homer Johns. 

Since her idol proved unresponsive, Elise ran away from school. She is 
subsequently brought back b}' Austin who despite the awful consequence of 
losing the school, succumbed to her charm. Such is the power of that illusive 
and alluring quality, charm. 



(T9; 



Class '2£ MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



New Year a'la Class of '22 



Ton rcsolutioii.s standing in a line. 

One didn't study; then there were nine. 

Nine resolutions not to be late, 

One slept an extra hour; then there were cighL 

Eight resolutions fit to go to heaven. 

One talked in chapel; then there were seven. 

Seven resolutions I i\I_y what a fix! 

One slept in class ; then there were six. 

Six resolution, 4tai"-d to keep alive. 

One ate in the halls; then there were five. 

Five resolutions, sworn to sin no more ; 

One masticated gum in class; then there were four. 

Four resolutions,, as firm as could bS, 

One cut class; then there were three. 

Three resolutions, just enough to do, 

One had a "school night date;" then there were two. 

Two resolutions, best under the sun. 

One borrowed lunch money ; then tiiere was one. 

One resolution, my story's almost done. 

She failed to write her chemistry ; then there were none 

Resolutions broken, nothing more to fear — 

Good-bye, resolutions, "till another year. 

— FiiAXCEs Shermax. 



(wi) 




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Tubman MAIDS and A MAX Class '"2'2 



The Athletic Association 



^^->' HE Athletic Association was organized three years ago, its object being 
^^^ to raise the standard of the school and to promote greater team spirit. 

Although this association has been most successful, a new Constitution 
has been adopted. 

The officers of the Association are elected in January of each year. The 
president is chosen from the senior class, the vice-president from the junior 
class, the treasurer from the junior class, and the secretary from the sopiiomore 
class. One girl is chosen from each of the above classes including the fresh- 
man and sub-freshman classes, to act as representative on the council. 

The Athletic Council is composed of the officers of the Association, the re- 
presentatives from the different classes, a member of the faculty, tlie physical 
director and her assistant, and the principal. 

The Council presents all letters and numerals to those girls winning same 
and may withhold any letter or numeral which it deems the winner unworthy 
of wearing. 

— Edna Agee. 



(83) 




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Tubman MAIDS iind A :\IAX Class '2% 



Basketball 

An IlkisivL' Spheroid 



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ASKETBALL, the game of — a wonderful pastime ; all a girl has to do, 
after she has made the Varsity, is to go out and work like a dray-horse 
and a pile-driver and a street-roller for a couple of hours every afternoon, 
get kicked in the shins and biffed in the eye and rolled in the dirt, or on the 
floor, and ragged by one coach, one captain and one umpire. That's all she 
has to do, except to learn a Jot of signals so she can recognize them in the 
fraction of a second, be able to recite the rules backward and forward and both 
ways from the middle, and live on such indigestible things as beef, rice and 
prunes. If she fails to do all these things she is called "mutt" and a "dude" 
and a "disgrace to the school" and unless she is lucky enough to break a leg 
and get out of it before the big games, she has sixty minutes of glory and 
twenty-four hours of heart disease and her picture in the Annual — she knows 
it's her picture because there is a statement underneath that Sally Jones is the 
third criminal from the left in the backrow ! And it isn't the photographer's 
fault if the good looking forward in the back row turned her head just as the 
camera went snap, and all that is left of Sally Jones is a torn and lacerated 
left ear ! But it's worth it ! 

E. MOBLEY, '22. 



(85) 






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Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class "k 



To Our "Ex -Varsity" 



All great deeds are recorded, 

Somewhere in the book of time. 
Such as wars, inventions, discoveries. 

And other things sublime. 

We know you've accomplished a deed worth recording. 

In this wonderful book of Art, 
Instead your deed will be recorded 

In each and every Tubman heart. 

For we appreciate 3'our struggles and efforts, 

To win for us a name. 
And by so doing place us as equals 

With those in the ranks of Fame. 

We realize how you struggled and fought. 

In trying to do your best. 
But all great things must end somehow. 

So examinations did the rest. 

But think not of those unfortunate things, 

Ex-Varsity of '22, 
Instead, please accept and remember the fact, 

That we are very, very proud of you. 

VlEGINI.\ MOBLEY, '24. 



(91) 




^^ 




iS 



111 



Tiibman MAIDS and A MAN Class 'i 



A Social Error 



XT was a warm, bright (lav in June. Scliool !iad been out two weeks, but 
tiic spirit of graduation had not yet died out of Tom Lee's heart, and lie 
was making tlie weary trip from Hanover to Bristol, on a dismal Pullman 
oar, his mind and thoughts turned more than once to those happy days just 
passed — the Senior hop, the prom, the S.A.E. banquet, and especially to those 
people who are necessary to every boy's good time. As he was thus dreaming, 
lie turned his head to scan the occupants of the car. There were two or three 
business men, just returned from the smoker; an elderly lady, with a small boy 
ndio seemed to be fascinated with the scenery outside ; and just two seats ahead, 
across the aisle, a rather small but interesting looking girl. She, too, was 
gazing out of the window, and as Tom glanced in her direction, a happy thought 
entered his head. He reached in his hand bag, picked up a college magazine 
and sauntered in her direction. What was tlie iiarm.'' As he passed, she 
looked up, and he, making use of that glance, bowed, and asked her pardon for 
sitting down. He didn't know how to begin, but finally managed to impart the 
information tliat here was a book well worth the reading if she might care 
to do so. 

■'Only one of our school magazines — the last one of the year — and darn 
good, too," he explained. 

•'Why, this is very kind of you. I don't believe I'm acquainted with the 
school, though," tlie girl returned rather coolly. 

■'Guilford College. It's a whang — I mean, good old place! Maybe you'd 
like to hear something about it.''" This last rather eagerly. 

■'Why, no. I think I'd much prefer looking over the book. I'll return it 
in a few minutes." 

■'0, please ; in that case, I feel it my duty to explain some of its features — " 

''I detest agents !" 

"'Certain special features, the first of which — " 

■'Is this vour name written so boldly across the top ? I think I can manage, 
Mr. Lee.'" 

■'Then we are introduced !" triumphantly. 

''Are we?" 

■'I know enougli about you — " 

•'I'm sure my knowledge of you will suffice." 

"I know you are just the kind of girl I may expect to meet only under ad- 
verse circumstances. Why is it that cousins and everyday people whom you 
know are always so different; so, well — unattractive.'"' 

She was turning the pages slowly and apparently without interest. 

"For instance,'" he continued, pointing to a small sketch of a girl, which 
was loose in the magazine, "there is one of my cousin's chums ; I am to meet her 
this evening. Why doesn't she ride on trains, and let other people be chums.'"' 

The girl regarded the penciled caricature critically. She was biting her 
lips to keep from smiling. 

(93) 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 

"Mouth a bit too large," she commented to herself. She held tlie picture 
towards tlie light, and tilted her head to one side witii the air of a serious critic. 

Tom laughed, and the girl smiled in s))ite of herself. 

"Not large enougli? You don't know chums. Tall, slender, actually 
slim — " he darted a liasty glance at lier dari< eyes. "Gray eyes, too, you know 
— probably keeps her mouth open all the time." 

"I'd draw the line if she kept iier mouth o])en very much.' She felt it her 
duty to utilize this opportunity. 

"Don't you feel sorry for me?" 

"The — er — chum has my symj)atliy." 

"Why.'' Am I so bad.'' I'm sure if our positions — " lie found a new idea. 
"AVill my talking to myself disturb you.''" 

"I can't regulate that.'" 

"AVcll, it's just this way," he soliloquized. "I have a cousin — but it's not 
my fault. The cousin has a chum, Laura Weston, whom she thinks is — well — 
an angel. That's her fault. I've met such angels before." 

"Having any fun.'" 

"I could liave more.'" 

"If I could ask a question — " musingly " — it would be why you are going 
there in spite of this.''" 

"Promised. I'm to fill out a house party, you see. I don't expect a good 
time. It's merely a matter of duty." 

"One should do one's duty, by all means." 

The whistle was blowing. Tom turned and addressed her directly : 

"Perhaps you will be relieved to know that I am going to get off at the 
next station. Of course we shall never see each other again, and, if you II allow 
me, I'm sure I'll be sorry. You won't mind my saying that I believe I'll even 
miss you — am I acting funny? I don't believe I ever was in a position like 
this before. I ho{)e you'll forgive me for coming up — I don't know what made 
me do it — but, really, circumstances should alter cases, sometimes." 

She was having a great deal of unnecessary trouble with a tiny valise strap, 
but managed to hear. 

The train was about to stop. She arose. 

"You are not going to get off here?" His surprise was genuine. 

"Of course. What would your cousin think of a guest who deserted her at 
the critical moment?" 

"Why, I'm not deserting. I wish — " he paused and began thinking. 

"I suspect I'll have to see you again," she said. He was following her to 
the door. "And I'll try not to keep my mouth open all the time." 

It was too gi-eat a thing to be easily comprehended. 

"Can it be — are you Laura Westen?" he asked abruptly. 

She smiled maliciously at his obtuseness. "I'll be so introduced, unless 
you — you — desert." 

"Well, I'll be hanged !'' he muttered under iiis breath. Then, "One must 
do one's duty," he quoted meaningly. 



-Clifford Kelly, '22. 



(94) 



Tnhman MAIDS and A MAN Class 'S£ 



What They Call Us 



Oh, did you ever chance to be 

At chapel exercises, 
When visitors had come to see 

Our famous enterprise? 

Oh, it's a treat most great and rare 

To liear the rich recitals 
Of those who face the "lassies fair," 

And hand them out strange titles. 

They're simply "scared to death," they say, 
And -yet they're quite de-e-lighted ! 

But if they start to talk or pray, 
'Tis plain they are excited. 

Some seem to think we're mermaids rare. 

They speak of a "sea of faces ;" 
"Gazelles" they call us, when they dare 

To view our outdoor races. 

Upon the stairs we're "angels bright. 

Ascending and descending;" 
They say when they see that lovely sight, 

"On you our city's depending!" 

Why love each one our school so dear. 
Who through oui:^door"way passes.'' 

It's just because they're gathered here 
"Augusta's bonnj' lasses." 

— K. Crawford, '24. 



(95) 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN Tiibi 



The "Reds" of Tubman 



One day this year 

A maid with auburn hair 

Conceived a "bright" idea. 

From tliis came our little club. 

Which "Titian"" we did dub. 

With meml)ershi]) from Senior to Sub. 

But of all members this true: 
They have hair of that brilliant hue 
Called auburn or red, one of tiic two. 

About our doings, "mum"s the word ;"' 
We're a secret society as you've heard. 
But I'll tell you a thing or two that's occurred. 

Our initiation is heaps of fun. 

Though the goats are not sorry when it is done, 

And of jolly good times we are having a ton. 

We have a serious purpose, too — 
I>augh if you want to — that is true; 
But what it is we'll never tell ijou. 

So, girls, if your hair is red, 

You may .join the Titian Club, as I've said ; 

If not — witli henna annoint vour head. 



(96) 



n 



TITIAN CLUB 



OKThatlHadHair 
0| Hct»i\a Hue ! ' 




Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



The Invisible Man 



XT was midniglit. The dormitory had at last settled down to perfect 
quiet, and the last light had been cautiously put out. The various art- 
icles which had covered the transoms and filled the cracks under the 
doors, so placed to fool tiie proctors, liad been carefully removed. Betty and 
I just could not sleep ; it was such a "stuffy" night. Then, too, I had a funny 
feeling — jjcrhaps you have felt it sometimes yourself. I felt sure that some- 
thing exciting was going to happen. I was just about to speak my thoughts 
to Betty, when, "Binnie,'' she said, "I feel as if something were going to hap- 
pen." The clock downstairs in the hall struck twelve in a slow, monotonous 
tone. How quiet it seemed ! 

Then, suddenly, we heard a ])iercing scream, seeming to come from the third 
floor; then another from the second floor. The shivers ran up mv spine — and 
down again. I sjjrang from my bed, near the window, to Betty's which I know 
IS at least six feet away, and there we clung together. We could hear more 
screams, yelling back and forth, from room to room, and the scramble and 
scurry of many ^eet. Suddenly, Betty and I sprang simultaneously to the 
floor. Grabbing our bathrobes we tore out into the hall and there, at the 
other end of the hall, near the head of the front stairs, was a crowd of girls. 

Sucii connnotion as we saw! Here, a girl chul in pale, pink j)ajamas, try- 
ing to have hysterics prettily ; there, another making a hasty exit to the lower 
floor by sliding down the banisters, with the ends of a vari-colored kimona flap- 
ping in the rear. Everywhere, girls, yelling, talking, and whispering; some 
in bathrobes, some in kimonas, and otliers in ])ajamas ; with hair in curlers, 
or braids, or hanging loose. 

We raced down the hall to the very center of the mob. There is something 
that has been puzzling me ever since. Why does everyone ask questions at 
tlie same time, when they know that no one is being heard.'' Well, I haven't 
found the answer yet. Betty and I did our sliare. I think I asked the most 
for I have been told many times that my middle name was "question-box." "Who 
screamed.'' and, "AVhat was it.''" were echoed by everyone. No one seemed to 
have a dfinite answer. "I heard some one say that somebody told them that 
they saw a man run down the hall," was about the most definite. 

Into this scene stalked Mrs. Condin, the matron. Here is another question. 
Why can't girls love or even like their matron? It seems as if I am always 
thinking (juestions that can't be answered. Utter silence greeted her. "Snoojiy," 
that is wiiat we called her behind her back, now lield the floor and she beat me at 
asking (juestions. After she had asked everything that had been asked before 
and received the same answers, greatly exaggerated, she ordered us to our 
rooms. By this time "Jinnnie" Owens was quite sure that she had seen a man, 
and Kay Hampton said she saw him as he reached the back stairs, and he had 
curly hair. 

(98) 



Tubman MAIDS a nd A MAN Class '22 

So we went to our rooms or, to be more exact, we went witliin a safe distance 
of them so we could reacli them if "Snoopy" were seen approaching. Finally, 
it was whispered, that she had been ex])loriniT the lower floor, and was on the 
way up stairs to do the same on our floor. We just had time to get settled in 
bed and hide "Sally" Baker, who happened to be in our room, under Betty's 
bed when in stalked "Snoopy.' In one hand she carried a flash light, in the 
other a revolver. You can't imagine how ridiculous she looked, in a kimona 
which was every color of the rainbow (she has awful taste) with her hair done 
up in curlers and a pair of red bedroom slippers, badly worn, adorning her feet. 
However, I couldn't even smile over the sight, for I was trembling with fear for 
■'Sally" under the bed. That flash-light meant "persnickity" inspection. Well, 
the first thing she did was to investigate the closets ; then with the use of the 
flashlight she explored under my bed, and then — started toward Betty's. 

"There is n-no onder m-my b-bed," stammered Betty. "Don't bother to 
1-look under it." 

Snoopy had a suspicion! I saw it in her eyes. She flashed the light under 
the bed and drew "Sally'' out by her long braids ; then she pushed her out into 
the hall with many threats about what would happen tomorrow. Poor "Salh'" ! 
Snoopy asked us numet'ous questions but, getting no satisfaction from our 
answers, she left. But, before she left, now this is the truth, she flashed the 
light under the bureau. The minute she got outside the door, Betty and I 
burst out laughing. It really was ridiculous, this looking for a man under 
every bed and bureau. 

Oh ! what a time we had getting up the next morning, ha\'ing had only a 
few hours sleep. But we had to do it, and it was a sleepy lot of girls that went 
down to breakfast that morning. Betty and I sat next to "Snoopy" at break- 
fast, and as I wanted to hear her opinions of the night's escapade, I asked her 
a few questions on the subject. Well, she- proceeded to tell me the whole story, 
as she had gathered it, bit by bit, from the girls. 

She said that a man was seen running along the front hall of the third floor. 
He was then seen running down the back stairs to the first floor, where he 
climbed out of an unlocked window near the stairs. He had curly red hair and 
light eyes, did not wear a mask, and wore no coat. He disappeared in a car 
which had been driven close to the "dorm." No one knew who he was or where 
he went. That was to be found out. 

At supper that night it was announced that the campus would be guarded 
and extra lights would be burned on the lower floor, all night. This added to 
the excitement. Was it a burglar or — well, what could it be.'' 

^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ 

It was just three weeks later, and "date" night. Tom and Kirk were out 
of town, so Betty and I had no dates for that night. I craved excitement and 
Betty admitted that she did, too, so we determined to do something to amuse 
ourselves. We finally decided to watch the "dates," and eight-thirty found us 
lying flat on our stomachs, at the head of the stairs on the second floor. 
Through the banisters we could see the couples, sitting around the parlor, try- 
ing not to look bored, but not succeeding. 

But what interested us most was the couple in the hall, sitting together on 
a wicker bench near the stairs. It was "Margie'' and "Bob" Carpenter, not 

(99) 



Class '££ M AIDS and A MAN Tub man 

an unfamiliar sight. "Margie" and "Bob" liave gone together ever since they 
were knee high to a pan-cake, and she has worn liis frat pin for ages. We could 
look right down on them and hear every word they said, without their detect- 
ing us. 

"We are in for a good time," I whispered to Betty. She nodded her head, 
implying "yes." 

At first the conversation between "Margie" and "Bob" was more or less 
general and uninteresting, but it was quite evident that "Bob ' was leading up 
to something. Then, suddenly, "Margie, do you know anything about the man 
who got in tlie 'dorm'.?" asked "Bob." 

"Yes," replied "Margie." "Do you want to know the truth.?" 

"Sure," was the reply. 

Betty and I j)ricked up our ears ; here was some excitement ! 

"Well, ' said "]Margic," "there wasn't any man." 

"What!" exclaimed "Bob." 

At the same instant, I nearly tumbled down the stairs from surprise, but 
Betty caught me. "You'd better stuff your handkerchief in your mouth," siie 
whispered, "it may be funny." We had each brought one along in case of 
such an emergency, so we did as she suggested. 

"No," "Margie" was saying, "there wasn't." 

"W-well," stammered "Bob." 

"I'll tell you all about it," interrupted "Margie." "This is the way it 
happened. 'Mor])hine Dunham and I ("Morphine" is "INIargie's" inseparable) 
craved excitement that evening, so we decided that at twelve o'clock I should 
run out into the hall on the third floor and scream. Then as soon as she heard 
me scream she should follow suit on the second. Well, as vou know," conti- 
nued "Margie," "wo did it." (Here I nudged Betty and she returned it.) 

"Then of course everyone came running out into the hall. By that time I 
had gone back to my room and paraded out a few minutes later, asking ques- 
tions to avoid suspicion. Well, the whole story originated and grew, through 
many vivid imaginations and exaggerations," "]Margie" concluded. 

"Well, I guess you got your excitement !" said "Bob.'' 

At that instant the "dates over" bell rang and in the confusion of "good- 
nights," Betty and I slipped back to our room feeling a great deal wiser than 
when we left it. There, we made an agreement that we would not tell a soul, 
and to this day, most of the girls and matron are ignorant of the circumstances. 
Mrs. Condin still tells of the "burglar" in Chandoin Hall. There is just one 
more question that puzzles me: "How can people have such vivid imaginations.'"' 

— Mary Briscoe. 



(100) 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAX CIuh 



A Tribute to Professor Garrett 

(With Apologies to Goldsmith) 



Beside 'von straggling fence that skirts the "Way," 
With girls abloom, unprofitably gay, 
■ There, in his noisy mansion skilled to rule, 
Professor Garrett taught Old Tubman School. 
A man most dear to all, both kind and true, 
We loved him well and every girl he knew ; 
"Twas only seldom did the lazy laggards trace 
The day's disaster in his kindly face, 
And seldom did we pass the word along 
"Watch vour step ; the Master got uja wrong," 
For he was kind and if at all severe, 
'Twas just to make us bow to art and shed a tear. 

— K. Wiggins, '25. 



(101) 



Class '"22 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



A SENIOR ANTHOLOGY 



In history Louise is always good, 
Miss Flisch can't say lier brain is 

wood. 
In fact in all her studies, she 
Is just as good as good can be. 
— ffi — 



Agee's good in any game ; 
Her path is joined to heights of fame. 
She basket balls and hockeys well, 
But her secret of strength she'll 
never tell. 

!fi 



Margaret Blitchington is plumj) and 

sweet. 
She's one big smile from head to'feet. 
Her hair is light ; her skin is too. 
And girls like her are surely few. 
— Si — 



Esther B. is fond of learning; 
To Europe maybe she's returning, 
Spanish she would like to know; 
Perhaps to Spain she wants to go. 



Agnes Bohler's as cute as can be. 
She's just a little girl from Senior C. 
She got her a beau with her winning 

ways ; 
They together take in all the plays. 
!fi 

You can't say that Anna's simple. 
Just because she has that dimple ; 
For the knowledge she imparts 
Is a joy to her teachers' hearts. 



Dorothy Bredenberg with hair so 

long 
Has never yet answered wrong. 
And when she says, "don't cha know," 
Her thoughts are going quick and 

slow. 

— £ — 



Helen Brenner is tall and slow; 
Her collars are high ; her skirts are 
low; 

She's just as pleasant as she can be, 
Go with her now and you will see. 
— W — 



Myrtice Brown is a shy little miss. 
Never known to take a kiss !(.'') 
She is as timid as she is fair. 

And oh ! what wonderful dark brown 
hair. 

— Ifi — 



Rosabel Burch in a Ford does ride; 
Some one else sits by her side ; 
Althougli she's fat and clever too. 
She makes a hit with quite a few. 



-S- 



A Cannon there is in Senior "C," 
A girl who's clever as she can be ; 
At typewriting letters she's hard to 

beat. 
Success in life she'll surely meet. 
Hi 



Alberta can smile for weeks and 

weeks. 
For she is big with rosy cheeks. 
Her hair's as black as anv coal. 
And basket-ball nmst be her goal. 



(102) 



Tuhi 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '^S 



A SENIOR ANTHOLOGY 



Elizabeth Carrere, meek and mild. 
Gives "excuses'" all the while ; 
Where'ere she'll come or where she'll 

go, 
She'll give excuses as before. 

Hi — 



Myrtle Churchill to the wordly eye 

Would seem to be both good and shy. 

But her friends in cooking sing a dif- 
ferent tune. 

They haye seen her wield a fork and 
spoon. 

— Hi — 



Ella Clarke is an all-around sport, 
She can drive her Ford into any port. 
She sure is sweet and clever too. 
And people know she's real true blue. 
— « — 



Ruth Cooper, attractive, charming, 

lovable, 
So all the boys believe ; 
If you don't study harder. 
In June you'll grieve. 



There are girls of various character 

Who climb the knowledge tree. 

But the one that's sure to reach the 

top 
Is neat little Annie B. 

Hi — 



Edna Davis of Senior C 

Is just as nice as she can be. 

But when her temper is up, I fear, 

Siie'll let you know that she is there. 

— S — 



O, Melville Doughty is a poet. 
And I'm quite sure that we all know 

it. 
For talks in chapel, too, she has fame, 
She has our supjiort e'er her aim. 

— Hi 



Elinor Elliot drives her car. 
She's never known to go too far. 
Although she's watched by many an 

eye. 
Still she's bashful, timid and shy. 

Hi 



Mildred Gardner is clever and fair. 
Brilliancy reigns in the color of her 

hair ; 
Although she is both quiet and slow 
Her walk will surely win her a beau. 
Hi — 



Bessie Belle Gilchrist, so they say, 
Toils over lessons every day ; 
Hard she works, her reward to win, 
Conquering chemistry and Lat-in. 



-Hi- 



Eloise Davidson with eyes so blue. 
Would make a friend both kind and 

true. 
The light of joy is in her eyes. 
Let's us know that she is wise. 



Caroh'n Gilchrist comes over the hill, 
A good long way in order to fill 
Her thirsty soul at the Pierian 

spring 
Where Muses to her knowledge bring. 



(103) 



Class '2'Z 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



A SENIOR ANTHOLOGY 



We like Kathleen wlio's never mean 
Anl always knows her lesson 
To iiave her in our Senior Class ! 
We're thankful for tlie blessin'. 

— !fi — 



Irene Grusin is sweet and fair 
And when you see her pretty hair, 
You'll say she is the rarest girl 
On this side of the big round world. 

!fi — 



An early bird is Josie Hall, 
For every morn she's heard to call 
"Moses, Moses, come open the gate 
For I'm afraid I'll be terriblv late." 



ffi 



Pauline has brown eyes and hair 

Oh! she's so very fair; 

She'll surely get you in a snare. 

Oh bovs ! Oh bovs ! Beware ! Beware ! 



S 



If you say there's no talent in tiiat 

class 
You'll make a mistake and surely 

pass 
Without thought the pride of our 

ring 
Blanche Harrison, who studies to 

learn to sinji. 



Mary Henry is smart, of course. 
Her brilliance conies from many a 

source. 
Her wit and sense will long remain. 
For she will always have the brain. 



Edna Hutchinson, it would seem 
Is hard to beat in an oral tlienie ; 
The teachers think she's quite divine 
For, in her work, she's always fine. 

!fi 



Of all the tilings that are in books, 
Mattie does know a lot ; 
She can answer at once, with a pleas- 
ant smile 
Things we others have forgot. 

— ffi — 



Mildred Jennings likes our teacher ; 
This is her most prominent feature ; 
Every where that Mildred goes 
Who is with her.'' Evervone knows. 



-ffi- 



Clifford Kelly pretty and sweet. 
Has all the boys at her feet. 
She ought to try with all her might 
To conquer lessons — if it takes all 
night. 

Bi 



Ruth Kitchens has a kind, sweet face, 
Slie carries herself with "entle srace. 
In tills world she'll win much fame. 
And leave it taking a worthy name. 

— S — 



Dessie Kuhlke has a ciiarniing grace 
Her smartness in books reflects on 

her face. 
Like Robert E. Lee she lias made her 

name ; 
She lias gained iiigh honor and a 

great deal of fame. 



Uui) 



T lib III an 



IMAIDS und A MAX 



Class '^"2 



A SENIOR ANTHOLOGY 



Eleanor I^anhani is licr name 

Who has acquired so very niucli fame, 

Bv playing the part of the wonderful 

Bob, 
That she's almost as noted as Au- 
gusta's Ty Cobb. 

— ffi — 



Esther Lichtenstein you all know. 
Who leaving the class room is very 

slow ; 
She's the jolliest in the class, 
She's always such a smiling lass. 

— ffi — 



Sw'eet sixteen — Miss Dora's pet, 

A cuter girl you've never met. 

An actress, surely will be Inez 

If you don't believe it, wait and see. 



Vera McGowen of Senior C 
Wears her dress above her knee. 
Wlien you see her on the stage, 
You have to say she's all the rage. 



tfi- 



Dorothy always is so Merry, 
She's very fond of her dear Perry. 
]\Iiss Dora likes her — lucky girl — 
Even though her hair won't curl. 



-ffi- 



Miss Ruth Miller 

In class no one could be stiller. 

She listens with care, and a serious 

air 
While the teachers with knowledge 

fill her. 

— S 



On the very front seat, at the tech- 

er's feet. 
Sits Miss Elizabeth Marsh, 
With her quiet smile, she does beguile, 
To her they can't be harsh. 



"Where there's a will there's a way," 
To Gracewood she'll go some day, 
Elizabeth Matthews, neat and trim. 
Thinks each day always of — school. 



Frances Mathews is grave in looks ; 
Her arms are always full of books. 
But if you'd hear her tell a joke. 
You'd laugh until you'd nearly choke. 



Josie Milligan is just the girl 
To set a boy's heart awhirl, 
She'll agree with you on anything. 
Friends to her this point will bring. 



-ifi- 



Elizabeth Mobley, good dancer. 
Good swimmer, all round athlete. 
But in French and Chemistry 
Her knowledge is — petite. 



-S- 



Amelia Mohrman is full of life ; 
All study to her is sure a strife. 
She's very particular about her looks, 
I think she'd do better if she studied 
her books. 



(105) 



Class 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



A SENIOR ANTHOLOGY 



Calm and quiet is this girl 
Wlien the rest are in a whirl. 
Lila Morris is the one I mean ; 
With Avice Smith slie's always seen. 

!fi 



Bessie Move greets you with smiling 

face ; 
She's tall and handsome and full of 

grace. 
She's not an athlete nor can she sing, 
But siie's always exempt in every- 



thing. 



-ffi- 



Evelina Mulcay though somewhat fat 
Is an all round sport, be sure of that ; 
She seems to me a mighty good friend 
One on whom you can always depend. 



-!fi- 



Nonie Mullins is true and fair. 
And girls like that are very rare. 
In history class slie is so bright. 
Her answers there are always right. 

— tfi — 



Yes, her name is Mildred O'Neal 
And I'm quite sure she doesn't feel 
That she should hide her pretty curls. 
When they're as pretty as any pearls. 



-B5- 



Montine Pardue will soon return 
To Johnson from whence slie came. 
Although I know he'll be so thrilled 
We'll miss her just the same. 



Eleanor Patch has curly hair; 
She's always willing to do her share. 
She's little and bright and sweet and 
smart ; 

We wonder who has caught her heart. 
— ifi — 



^Vhether you're young or old an:l 

hoary. 
And like to hear and enjoy a story, 
Then Comer Phillips is the girl 
To set you laughing in a whirl. 

— S — 

Felicia Ransey so stylish and neat 
At driving a Ford she can't be beat 
The study of bugs she likes the best 
Because it is taught bv Francis L. 
West. 

— ffi — 



After much effort Charlie Mae learn- 
ed history ; 

That study which seems to be such a 
mystery. 

Slie tells Miss Flisch she would if she 
could ; 

Miss Flisch says her brains are 
Scattered-good. 

— Bi — 



Marguerite Scott is very sweet, 

A girl whom every one likes to meet, 

Her hair is brown with a permanent 

wave. 
Something that all of the other girls 

crave. 

— S — 



Saphronia Scott is not 

A Hottentot. Then what.? 

A Senior who knows a lot, about the 

geometry dot ; 
This our friend, Sajihronia Scott. 



;iOO) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Class '"22 



A SENIOR ANTHOLOGY 



Terpsichore, Muse of the dance, 
Is Frances — quite petite. 
Thougli her mind is alwa^'s in a 

trance, 
Well knows she how to use her feet. 
— !fi — 



Josephine Sibley is sort of tall 
And in her lessons never does fall. 
She has pretty hair and nice ways, 

too, 
We think she's ever so fine Don't you.'' 
— !fi — 



Sarah B. Simmons is joll}' and gay 
She does her lessons every day. 
She's just as sweet as she can be 
Look her up and you will see. 



-!fi- 



In Senior C is Lillian Skinner, 
I wonder what lad is trying to win 

her.? 
When she's around she's never heard ; 
Her jTiotto is, "Action speaks louder 

than word.'' 

— !fi — 



If out for a frolic or hard at work 
There is nothing that Avice Smith 

would shirk. 
She spends her time in puffing her 

hair 
And yet for lier lessons she has great 

care. 

— !fi — 



Helen Smith's a tiny mite. 

But full of fun and cute and bright. 

She studies late — burning midnight 

oil. 
But powers that be, don't appreciate 

toil. 



Lucille Steinberg is very slow ; 
In her studies she makes no siiow. 
She's happy-go-lucky and likes to 

talk, 
I hope with fortune she'll always 

walk. 

!fi — 



Ethel Stone is a very shy lass, 

But in her studies she will pass. 

If you knew this girl, then you would 

see 
That a nicer one there couldn't be. 

— S — 



Though she has freckles on her face, 
Each separate one I'd call a grace. 
Her character belies her name, 
Martha Story will be written in the 
Hall of Fame. 

!fi 



Virginia Sturman, she's a tiny mite. 
Slim in wrath, and short in height. 
Her hair is dark and her eyes are 

brown. 
And we never, never see her frown. 

Hi 



Katheryn Twiggs is, oh, so slow ; 
This, of course, all at Tubman know ; 
When to school she comes in late, 
A sad, sad tale she will relate. 



— !fi — 

Elise Van Pelt has lovely hair. 
Her eyes and skin are bright and fair, 
She plays her bells with perfect time, 
I sure do bet she wiU like tliis ^■.. 



(107) 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



A SENIOR ANTHOLOGY 



Dora Vlachos, the dark-haired maid. Good dancer, good talker, good 

From far across tlie sea. Senior all round; 

Will surely win for herself success Are the traits of Loretta that al- 

In wliatever place she may chance to ^''^^''^ ^'"'^ fo^'i^^- 

be, Watson, Watson, rah ! rah ! rah ! 

Watson, Watson, "Sis !" boom ! bah I 



-*- 



-a- 



"Happy" in heart, 

"Happv" in mind ; Dorotliy Wheeler, "Silence is gol- 

"Happy,'' "Happy," '^^■"'" ^^.^ ^™ ^°^^' 

All til ■ time ^^^ "''^ ^^ '"''"'^ when she grows old. 

Although she is so very shy 
S" She has a mischievous look in her eve. 



Iaicv Watkins in Senior C 

Is just as smart as she can be. 

Her iiuir is black as the starless I" l^^''" '^"^'^"^ ^'^^^'^ ^''^'■-V '^mart, 

],i„.|,t ; But, Oh, how good she is in art ! 

When it comes to books she sure is This girl we know is Florence White 

bright. The one who likes to do what's right. 

— K — 



Maudell Wren's greatest delight 

Is going to town with Tommie White. 

But with her books this makes no 

change. 
She's always on her highest range. 



(108) 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '22 



Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea 



^^ — I'ACK GRENVILLE was probably the slivest man that had ever reached 
\^_^ tlie age of twenty. At any rate, Tech could not boast of having had a 
like phenomenon in its history ; Jack was a Senior, had a good collection 
of French novels, and yet — had never called on a girl ! "Jack's a pretty good 
ole chap. He has some good qualities," the fellows would say, but I am con- 
fident these qualities would have been unknown, and Jack would have "wasted 
his sweetness on the desert air'' if he hadn't possessed a certain magic in kick- 
ing goals. Although quiet and uninteresting, he won the toleration of his class 
mates by this remarable talent. 

Jack's aunt who had raised him from childhood, was principal of Grenville 
Academy for Young Ladies. During the Christmas holidays she insisted that 
he visit her at the school. Thinking all the young ladies would be home for the 
holidays, he felt quite safe in consenting to come. The thought that some lived 
too far to go home did not penetrate his skull. 

He was in his aunt's old room (she had moved to the left wing), enjoying a 
naughty French novel (an accomplishment he had acquired- at Tech) when 
there was a tap at the door. Jack became suddenly nervous. He half uncon- 
sciously rose and was in the act of locking the door when he recovered his senses 
and contented himself with burying his nose in his book and calling not too 
coaxingly, "Come in." 

A pi'etty, impish looking girl came in. Jack had a curious desire to crawl 
under the bed or to jump out the window, but the fire escape was locked and he 
felt an undisputable loyalty to his neck. 

"Where's Miss Grenville.?" asked Mary. 

"Er — ah — er, I don't — er — know. Thank you — thank you-thank — " and 
it seemed as if something were wrong with his tongue ; somehow it just wouldn't 
behave. To his confusion the horrid young lady giggled. 

"Can you lend me some vanishing cream.'"' she asked. 

"On the dresser," was the maximum of speech he could let loose just then. 

"But this is cold cream. I want vanishing cream — the kind that makes the 
powder stick on your face. Won't you help me find Miss Grenville's vanishing 
cream.'"' she said with maddening sweetness. 

He leaned against a chair to keep from fainting. He revived when the 
devilish young lady announced that she had found it. He thought Dame For- 
tune had fallen for him, but when his tormentor said : "I'll bring back your 

(109) 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 

vanisliing cream in a minute," lie realized that fickle Fortune had only shot 
him a line. 

That afternoon, Jack was in his room (his aunt's old room) dressing or 
rather undressing for a swim. Although Mary had not yet returned the vanish- 
ing cream, he had failed to lock the door. He had just reached that stage of 
undress where a man resembles a prize fighter when someone knocked. He was 
panic stricken. Why hadn't that awful Mary chosen a more convenient time 
to I'eturn that odious vanishing cream? At the south end of the room he saw 
a door he had never noticed. He made a dive for it, lost his balance and fell — 
not in a closet as he expected, but — into the back yard where several girls were 
playing base ball ! 

He was in a frightful predicament. Should he remain with this bunch of 
girls or return to that terrible one who was worse than a bunch? A cold breeze 
decided his fate; it was warmer inside. 

He entered the fatal door and there was — his aunt who said, "Jack, when 
we changed rooms I left some things behind. Have you seen my vanishing 
cream?'' 

— Comer Phillips, '22. 



(110) 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class 'i 



"Tubman Rhymes" 



A Senior, forlorn — er — . 

Sat in a corner — 
Exams were drawing nigli ! 

She stuck in her thumb — er — 
And pulled a diploma, 

And said, "What a good girl am I !" 

* * « * 

Little Miss Cram lost her exam 
And couldn't tell where to find it. 

Leave it alone, and it will come home 
And bring its sad "tale" behind it. 

* ^- * * 

Sing a song of sixpence, pocket full of lunch. 
Eating in the building, along with all the "bunch." 
Mr. Garrett softly enters, reports them with a grin — , 
Now wasn't tiiat a dainty fix to get poor Seniors in.'' 

^ ii.- ^ =Sl; 

Humpty dumpty talked in the hall, 
Humpty dumpty had a great fall. 
All the king's horses and all the king's men 
Couldn't put Humpty together again. 

— Melville B. Doughty, '22. 



(Ill) 



Chiss 'S. 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



"Our Able Assistants" 




Louise Wilson 
She's charming, she's witty, 
She's bright, and she's ])rctty, 
She's assistant to T. Harry 
Garrett. 




Kmnia I'kuikett, jack-of-all 

trades, 
Is director of all of our play- 
She is petite and masculine 
And as a hero she's divine. 



Mrs. Parks 
On account of illness, it has 
been impossible to get her 
picture for our annual. Mrs. 
Parks is the manager of the 
indispensable lunch room at 
Tubman,, and we cannot neg- 
lect to express our whole- 
hearted a])])reciation to her 
for the wonderful succes.s that 
she has made of it. We 
sincerely wish for her recov- 
ery, and we anxiously wait 
for her return to Tubman. 

(112) 




Leah White 
Kvervone at Tubman 

Knows I^eah White. 
l'".\ervone knows just the same 

She makes us all i\\)vright! 



;tm 



^ 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '22 



Do You Suppose- 



Miss Hamilton and Miss Russell will ever find a beau? 

Catherine Twiggs will get a "dip"? 

£lizabeth Mobley will ever learn French? 

Irene Grusen will ever stop begging for A-(-'s? 

Josie Hall ever stops giggling? 

Miss Page will ever cease talking in an unknown language to her French class? 

Miss Come^' will ever stop walking at the rate of sixty miles an hour, (especially 
to the office to hand in "yellow cards")? 

Miss Louise Parks ever gets angry? 

Mary Henry ever forgets to study? 

Alberta Caspary will ever get thin? 

Dorothy Bradenberg will ever "fix up her hair"? 

The teachers will stop parking on Clifford's attitude? 

Lucy Watkins will ever weigh 100? 

Margaret Blitchington will ever attain the "height" of her ambition? 

Elizabeth Carrere will ever get to school on time? 

A whole mirror will ever grace the locker room? 

A person exists who can decipher Frances Sherman's penmanship? 

There is a Tubman girl who has not read the "Sheik"? 

Josie Milligan will cease to be the apple of "Adam's" eye? 

Katherine Kirkland will ever get her teeth adjusted? 

Felicia Ransey could hurry to class (or elsewhere)? 

Mildred Jennings will forget the "West"? 

Annie B. walks the baby? 

Vera will ever stop looking like a Sub and resemble a dignified Senior? 

Inez Lyon will ever be able to pronounce words of more than two syllables? 

Sis will ever stop "a' wearing o' the green'? 

Mr. Garrett and Miss Flisch will ever agree on the "Suffrage Question"? 



(113) 



Class '22 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tuhm'a 



"Familiar Faces" 





Mose, Mose, mows tlie lawn; 

He gets here at the break of dawn; 

His work is fine, we all admit ; 

At Tubman School lie makes a hit. 



Austin, Austin, is a good old sport ; 
He always marks off the tennis court. 
In all his work you'll surely say, 
He does his best dav bv day. 




Eva, Mattie, Minnie, 

Queens of the Lunch Room, three, 

Tliey know how to wield a nioj) and broom 

Wliorcver thev chance to be. 



(114) 




1 



Class '« 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



Tlie world is old yet likes to laugh ; 

New jokes are hard to find: 
Sometimes a well put gaff 

Won't tickle every mind ; 
So if I pull some ancient joke 

Decked out in modern guise, 
Don't frown and sagely croak, 

Just laugh — don't be too wise. 
^ * * 

Teacher : "Wliat people lived dur- 
ing the middle ages?" 

Student : "Middle aged people I 

suppose." 

* * * 

First Senior: "I don t want the 
bones in mv neck to show in mv pic- 
ture." 

Second Senior : "Tiiat's all rigiit ; 
Mr. Sales will take them out." 
t- ^ ^ 

Sub, mournfullv: "I gotta know." 
'Nother: "You did.^ I thought "E" 
was the lowest mark." — Ex. 

* * * 

Wash Failed to Come In! 
Miss Russell was seen in ]\Iiss 
Abernathy's jumper and sweater! 

» * * 

"I have found the enemy and they 
are hours,'' muttered the student who 
was arranging his schedule. 

^ ^ ^ 

He: "Are you trying to make a 
fool of me?" 

She: "No — I never interfere with 
nature." 

* * * 

Men are natural! v grannnatical. 
Yes? 

Wlien they see an abbreviated skirt 
tiiey always look after it for a period. 

* * * 

Miss Woods : "When does a book 
become a classic?" 

Elizabeth Carrere : "Wlien its read 
in school." 

(Some one wants to know if tlie 
Sheik is a classic.) 



^liss Flisch, talking about the De- 
claration of Independence: "Who 
suggested it ?" 

Out of tiie silence, a still, small 
voice: "I did." 



Miss Woods : "Mattie, wliat does 
Ladv Macbeth mean bv the 'damned 

spot"'?" 

Mattie: "I don't know anything 

about the damn spot." 

* * * 

Mr. Cordle says lie can teach 
French better at night. 
Who's the pupil ? 

» * * 

Class Stones 

Sub-Freshman Soapstone 

Freshman Emerald 

Sophomore Blarney 

Junior Grindstone 

Senior Tombstone 

Post-Graduate Solitaire (?) 

* * * 

Hard on the Old Boy 

While reviewing tiie "Sir Roger De 

Coverly Pajjers" Miss Comey asked 

for obsolete words. After several 

had been given, Deryl Wolfe spoke : 

"Miss Comey, isn't Dryden one?" 

^ * * 

Sayings of Famous Students 

You can study some of your les- 
sons all of the time, and all of your 
lessons some of the time, but show 
me the girl that can study all of her 
lessons all of the time ! 

Give me geometry and give me 
death. 

Millions for lunch but not one cent 
for street car fare. (When you can 
get a ride.) 

S]icecli was given to Tubman girls 
to conceal their ignorance. 

After exams comes a reckoning. 

Learning is silver ; remembering is 
gold. 



(ll(i) 



Tub man 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '32 



All that shines is not brilliancy. 

There's many a slip twixt resolu- 
tion and fulfillment. 

Tests never come singly. 

A girl is known by the dates slie 
keeps. 

Necessity is the mother of fabri- 
cation. 

A glib tongue and a carefree air 
often hide an aching heart. 



Miss Holkv : "Have you a ques- 
tion, Katlierine?" 

Katherine: "Xo'm, I just want to 
ask you something." 

* * * 

Miss Holley : "Take propositions 
1:3 and 15." 

Irene: "Miss Holley, where is pro- 
jjosition 14.'"' 

Miss Hollev: "Wliv, between 13 
and 1.5." 



Miss Flisch : "Miss Carrere, how 
did the pioneers cross the mountains." 

Elizabeth : "I guess they went in 
boats.'" 

* ^ ^ 

Mr. Garrett, entering 27: "Miss 
Woods — er — pardon me, Miss Page ; 
I seem to have changed your name." 

Miss Page, coyly : "I didn't know 
vou could do that Mr. Garrett." 



"What's the masculine for laun- 
dress.?" 

"Chinaman." — Ex. 



,.Prof. : "Decline love. Miss Jones." 
Miss Jones: "Decline love, prof..'' 
Xot me!'' 



Popular Fiction 

"Let Bygones Be," by Gones. 
"Yes" by George. 
"Rock A" bv Babv. 
"The Fly" by Night. 
"Man Cannot Live" by Bread A. 
Lone. 

"Not" bv A. Jugful. 
"Do If bv Hooker Crook. 
"Missed" by A. Mile. 
^ * * 

During basket ball practice, ]Miss 
Briscoe advised one of the forwards 
to, "Dribble to the side and shoot 
yourself." 



The Freshmen were greatlv amused 
Feb. 23 when Mildred O'Neal "kicked 
the bucket." (Mose left a bucket un- 
der one of the seats in chapel.) 

* * » 

Miss Comev : "Wliat is the mood 
of 'The Raven'.?" 

Sara: "Subjunctive." 

* * * 

When asked about her plans for 
the future. Miss West tells us she is 
going to keep house for "Mama." 

* ^ * 

Miss Page: "Louise, what is 
'd'eau'.?" 

Louise : "Money." 

* * * 

Mrs. Green, in Fresh Civics : 
"What is a caucus.?" 

Fresh : "A caucus is something that 
looks like a turtle." 



Soirie Beau 

Miss West : "Minnie, what on earth 
are you fidgeting so about.?" 

Minnie: "Well, Miss West, I've 
lost my bow." 

Frances: "No, you haven't; here's 
your bow on my lap." 
« * « 

Miss Eve : "How do vou measure 
gas.?" 



Ruth Burnett: "By the quarter." 



(117) 



Class '^'2 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tub ma n 



Mary : "Can you get shocked by a 
telephone?" 

Miss Eve : "It depends on whom 
you are talking to." 

* *- -* 

Teacher: "Mary, what is the Jus- 
tice of Peace?" 

Mary : "The Justice of Peace is a 
piece of justice." 

^ ^ ^7 

Curses on that fateful day 
I joined that history class. 

I thought I surely had a "crip,'' 
But now I say, Alas ! 

-* * * 

Senior: "I thought you took tliat 
math last term." 

Junior: "I did but I was so goo;l 
the faculty encored me." 

* * « • 

Jimmie : "May I hold your hand 
for a second?" 

Dot: "How will you know when the 
second is up?" 

Jinnnie: "Oh! I'll need a second 
hand for that." 



Du Francais! 

Miss Page: "Doris, does tliat 
agree?'' 

Doris: "No, it's a woman."' (Mean- 
ing it's feminine.) 

* * * 

Fresh (writing a theme): "Sav, 
does a prune grow on a tree?'' 

Friend : "Nope, you fish, it grows 
on a vine like a banana." 

* * * 

Senior: "Fresii, what makes vou so 
small?" 

Fresh : "They raised me on canned 
milk and I'm condensed.'' — Ex. 

» * * 

Prof.: "'What would you call a 
man who pretends to know every- 
thing?" 



Fresh : "A professor." 



He : "We are coming to a tunnel — 
are you afraid?" 

She: "No, if you take that cigar- 
ette out of your moutii." 

^ ^ ^ 

Teacher : "How many kinds of 
poetrv are there?" 

StJdent : "Three.'' 

Teacher : "Name them." 

Student : "Lyric, dramatic, and 
epidemic." 

* * * 

Wise Soph to ignorant Crush: "Je 
t'adore !" 

Crush (unromatically) : "Aw, shut 

it yourself!" 

^ ^ ^ 

When Fjve brought woe to all man- 
kind. 
Old Adam called her wo-man. 
But when she woo'd with love so kind. 
He then j^ronounced it woo-man. 
But row with folly and with pride. 
Their husbands' pockets brimming, 
The ladies are so full of whims 
That people call them whim-men. 

—Ex. 

« * * 

Laura : "Oh, Ruth ! I'm so thrilled. 
I don't have to take my algebra 
exam." 

Ruth : "Grand ! I didn't know you 
were exempt." 

Laura : "I'm not. I flunked my 
dailies." 

* * * 

There's a Reason Why — 

Anna E. and Annie B. want to go 
to Agnes Scott. 

Eleanor Walton is Happy. 

Bessie Balk's when it comes to 
flowers. 

The teachers call us brainless. 

We love the Garrett. 

Florence is White while Mary is 
Brown and Sadie is Green. 

Inez should join the circus. (Not 
so deep as it might seem ; she's a 
Lyon.) 



(118) 



r lib man 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class 'M 



Tiio Freshmen inform us that Col- 
umbus discovered America in 1T83. 
Also tliat Georgia is in tlie Rocky 

Mountains. 

* * * 

Here's to the Tubman "Subs' 
Whose path seems strewn witli snubj, 
May we not always be "Subs," 
JSut ever loyal "Tubs." 

« * * 



If tiie JMississippi is the father oi 
waters, \s\\y don'c they call it the 
Mistersippi? 

Vera, giving an oral theme : "That 
night they ate in silence." 

Miss Come}' : "Don't use such a 
bookish expression." 

Vera : "Well, that night they ate 
with their mouths shut.' 
* ^ * 

Question on Junior English Exam: 
Form the plural of loaf. 
Answer: Loafers. 



I asked him if he kissed his girls ; 

He said he'd never tried. 
Just then I tried to hide a smile. 

And now I know he lied. 



A question asked on Feb. 2 : "Mr. 
Garrett, what is a ground-hog.''" 
"Sausage." 

* # ^ 

Latin i.^ a language, 

(At least it used to be), 
First it killed the Romans, 

And now it's killing me. 

Ma^' : "How did Mary get througli 
her exams so fast.'" 

Alice : "She didn't get through." 



Cuarlie: "Freddie, vou look like 
tiiC Arrow Collar man. 

Freddie (conceitedly) : "Thanks, I 
wish I could return tlie compliment." 

Charlie : "You could if you would 
iell as big a lie as I did." 



Preparing for test on Shakespeare, 
First Girl: "When was Siiakespeare's 
first work published.'"' 

Second Girl: "In 1912.'' 



Absent-minded girl writing secre- 
tary's report: "Wliat is the name of 
the English book we study in hist- 
ory.?" 



Sojjh : "We re going to have a half- 
k.oliday tomorrow." 

Fresh: "Why.?" 

Soph : "Why for General Lee, of 
course." 

Fresh (absent-mindedly) : "Well 
I wish they would have a holiday for 
General Science." 



Extract from theme on Whittier : 
"Whittier was born in America once 
when his parents were traveling 
abroad. He had many fast friends, 
but the fastest were Alice and Phoebe 
Gary." 



Emma (viewing statue-poses of 
Miss Flisch's play) : "What have I 
missed.'"' 

A Soph: "The Dream.' 

Emma: "What's this.? The night- 
mare.?" 



The folks who think our jokes are bum, 
Would surely change their views. 

If they'd compare the jokes we print 
With those that we refuse. 

(119) 



Class 'g^ MAIDS aiul A MAX Tiihman 



Things That Make Us Tired 

— o — ■ 

Afternoon classes. 

Chemical Equations. 

"Discuss fully—" 

"Eh bien— " 

"This is an Englisli Laboratory Period." 

"Columbia University graduates." 

Sarcasm (chemistry department please note!) 

Bobbed hair and rainy days. 

A. R. C. glee club jn-actices and "Jasper.'' 

"She Stoops to Conquer." 

One-armed chairs. 

Steps to — in History. 

Short Stories. 

Thirty-minute periods on half-holidays. 

"Wholesome sort of fun." 

(Signed) Sexior B. 



(120) 



Ttibman 



MAIDS ami A MAN 



Class 'i 



"The Flunker's Schedule" 





MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


1st 
PERIOD 


TARDY! 

(Sunday Night 
Date) 


TARDY! 
BEWARE 
A. R. C.!! 


TARDY ! 
GARBER 

DAVIS 
Night 
•Before. 


TARDY! 
The Car 
Just Would 
Not Start! 


TARDY! 
Oh! You 

Medical 
College ! 


2nd 
PERIOD 


SLEEPS 

in 

English Class 


BOOK 
REPORT! 
Booiv Not 

Read! 


READS 
"SHEIK" 
In Class. 


Oh! Miss 
Woods, 
I FORGOT 

My English. 


READS 
Motion 

Picture 
Magazine ! 


3rd 
PERIOD 


ILL 
To the Hos- 
pital 
Room 


CARRIES 
FAINTING 
GIRL HOME! 


USE OF 
COSMETICS 


"GYM !" 

SPRAINED 

ANKLE?! 


SLEEPS 
LTnder 

launch 
Counter ! 


4th 
PERIOD 


SENT From 
CLASS— 
Oh ! You Chew- 
ing Gum ! 


CAUGHT! 

WRITING 

NOTES. 

Yellow Card! 


To Library — 

TO 

STUDY?! 


SLEEPS 
INSTEAD 


LAST DAY 
OF MONTH— 

Excuses Not 
Made Up! 


5th 
PERIOD 


"SKIPS" 

The 
"SHEIK" 


DEAR ME! 
Miss West, 
I Forgot. 


CAUGHT! 

EATING IN 

HALL! 


DEAR ME! 

I'VE LOST 

MY FRENCH ! 


"SKIPS" 
"RODOLPH 
VALENTINO" 


6th 
PERIOD 


IS IN 
TOWN! 


MY LAB 

BOOK! 


I DIDN'T 
KNOW We 

Had That! 


MOTHER 
SICK- 
COULDN'T 
STUDY. 


AGAIN 
IN TOWN! 



(121) 



Class '^^ MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



A HOLIDAY" 

ANNOUNCED 




AT TUBMAN 

Calendar 

■ — o ■ 

Sept. 19th — School starts — our trouble begins. 

Sept. 20tli — Scliedule posted. 

Sept. 21st — Above schedule ciianged. 

Sept. 22nd and 26th — Continued changes in schedule. 

Sept. 27th — Final schedule posted — committee breathes a sigh of relief. 

Oct. lOth-1-lth — Class meetings. Officers elected. 

Oct. 25th — Money lost in Merchant's Bank — everybody weeping but 
Juniors weej) loudest. 

Nov. 10th — Mr. Garrett talks on Armistice Day — First reports! — Our 
trouble begins. 

Nov. 11th — First whole holiday — Armistice Day . 

Nov. 1.5th — Athletic Association membership drive. Excitement over 
thermometer. 

Nov. 17th — Miss Briscoe wears diamond ring — Who is he.''!.''! 

Nov. 18th — Basketball teams ciiosen. 

Nov. 24'th-25th — Thansgiving holiday — Oil! but we are tiiankful for — for 
the holiday ! 

Nov. 28th — School resumed. Much sorrow prevails. 

Dec. 8th — Senior Stunt Day. 

Dec. 9th — Tubman has its first and last movie — Marguerite Clarke in 
"Prunella." 

Dec. 15th — Gynmasium exhibition. 

(1^2) 



Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class 'SS 

Dec. 16th — Christmas liolidav. Mr. Hickman's present: music, a "sermon" 
and some good, old apples. 

•Tan. 2nd — School again ! Good things cannot last forever ! 

Jan. 3rd — Annual Staff chosen. 

Jan. 10th — Great scandal! Mr. Garrett caught chewing gum! ! ! 

Jan. 13th — Tubmapolitan Art given by College- Women's Club. 

Jan. 16th — Honor League Drive. 

Jan. 18th — Mary Henry had her hair up! 

Jan. 19th — Lee's birthday — half holiday. 

Jan. 23rd — Miss Woods broke her beads. 

Jan. 25th — Exams begin — nuff sed. 

Feb. 2nd — Miss West received a corsage of carnations. Mr. Garrett for- 
bids dancing. 

Feb. 3rd — Phonograph appears in Mile. Page's room. Basketball game — 
T. H. S. vs. Y. W. C. A. 

Feb. 6th — New schedule posted ! Girls stroll up and down the halls while 
schedule committee worries about them. 

Feb. 17th— "The Perils of Prune Ella." 

Feb. 20th — Senior Walking Contest. 

Feb. 24th — Mr. Garrett and Miss Flisch discuss thrills in chapel. 

Mar. 9th — Second diamond ring — Miss Videtto this time. 

April 21st— "The Charm School." 

May 30th — Senior Class Day. 

June 1st — Exams I *X ! .'' ! 

June 11th — Baccalaureate. 

June 15th — Graduation. 




MARY PLUHB 

(.123) 




/.TVxneycR- 



Class '££ 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 




Tubman MAIDS and A MAN Class '^ 




The Bank for Savings has soniething 
to offer which adds to the attractiveness 
of any girl. Love, beauty and winsome- 
ness cannot of course be stated in terms 
of money. But the habit of thrift, the 
love of simplicity, and the absence of ex- 
travagance which the Savings habit gives 
to a girl do much to insure the perma- 
nence of her attractiveness. 

You'd be Surprised 

Money spent is gone. Money stolen 
is dreadful. Money lost is too bad. Money 
in your pocket is skittish. Money in the 
Bank--you'd be surprised. Try it. Open 
a Savings Account. 



(12T) 



Class 'm 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



G. Lloyd Preacher 



Nicholas Mitchell 



Geo. Harwell Bond 



G. 



Lloyd Preacher & Co. 

Architects 

and 

Engineers 



OFFICES 

Lamar Buildinu: Healey Building: 

Augusta, Cra. Atlanta, Ga. 

Com. Nat. Bk. Bldt,^ 

Raleigh, N. C. 



I 



(128) 



1 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class "k 



+ — . 



TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 



T. H. GARRET, Principal 



THE GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOL 

SYSTEM OF AUGUSTA AND RICHMOND 

COUNTY, GEORGIA 



OFFICERS of the BOARD o/EDUCATION 

MR. JAMES L. FLEMING, President 

DR. T. E. OERTEL, Vice-President 
MR. LAWTON B. EVANS, Secretary and Supt. of Schools 



HIGH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

MR. T. I. HICKMAN, Chairman 

MR. C. E. WHITNEY MR. W. R. JOHNSTON MR. C. T. PUND 

MR. H. L. MURPHEY MR. WILLIAM MARTIN 

MR. ROBERT PEEBLES 



(129) 



Class '22 MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 



This Annual was Printed by 

Ridgely- Wing -Tid well Co. 

''Pleasing Printers'' 




Engraving Wedding Invitations 

Monogram Stationery 
Visiting Cards 

304 Seventh St. Augusta, Ga. 



+. , 



No potrait is so completely satis- 
fying as one made by a professional 
photographer. 

J. W. Sale 

SALE'S STUDIO 

Take Elevator Herald Bldg 

(130) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class 'Q2 



Compliments of 



Phone 2036 and say : 
"SEND ME THE HERALD" 



The Augusta Herald 

THE HOME NEWSPAPER 



The ONLY paper in many homes 
The ONE paper in most homes 



A. H. MERRY 



PIERCE MERRY 



MERRY & COMPANY 

Wholesale Fruits and Produce 

Our Speciality 

APPLES :: ORANGES :: BANANAS 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 



A. C. L. Tracks 



Cor. Ninth and Reynolds 



(131) 



Class 'gf 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



BUILD WITH BRICK OR TILE 

Whether it be sohd brick. Ideal brick wall, all 
tile, or tile faced with brick, you will have the most 
durable, safest, most economical, and most comfor- 
table house that can be built. 

Will be g-lad to tell you why. 

Georgia-Carolina Brick Co., 

HOWARD H. STAFFORD, President AUGUSTA, GA. 



*- 



Girls, it really isn't sporting of us to 
suggest that you buy your frocks, 
suits, hats, shoes, undies, etc., from 
us- --when so many of you do- --and 
always have, but 

When one knows a GOOD THING, it's awfully hard not to talk about 
it, and to keep on talking about it, so we just can't help reminding you 
that we have Sl^CH pretty things to wear — and that prices here are 
very VERY moderate 

(We always offer a special inducement to Tulinian 
Girls in purcliasinp tlie graduation wardrobe. Tliis in- 
ducement is offered (Iraduates of 1022. Asl^ about it.) 



Miie 



,?&a GEORCUW^REATEiSt Sf<^" 



I 



(132) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Clasn '£2 






BARRETT & CO., Inc. 

Augusta, Georgia 

The Largest Cotton Factors 
In the World 



EiFl Georgia & Florida (gip 

RAlL.>ArAY _^,^ , RAILWAY. 

Railway 

Before buying a farm, locating an industry or making an invest- 
ment, investigate the possibilities along the GEORGIA & FLORIDA 
RAILWAY. 

The standing saw mill timber, the fertile and productive farm 
lands at relatively low prices and the possible water power develop- 
ment is worth investigating. 

Call on or write 

D. F. KIRKLAND, W. E. FRENCH, 

General Manager, Immigration Agent, 

Augusta, Ga. Valdosta, Ga. 



RAILWAY 



R. C. HICKS, Traffic Manager 
Augusta, Ga. 



(133) 



EsF 

RAILV\^AY 



! 

-If 



Class '2^ 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tub ma H 



TERMINAL HOTEL 



B. D. DUNCAN, Manager 

Augusta, Georgia 



OPPOSITE POST OFFICE - ONE BLOCK FROM UNION DEPOT 



Palmer-Spivey Construction 
Company 

Builders of the New Tubman 



Augusta 



Georgia 






(134) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '^22 



Augusta- Aiken Railway & Electric 
Corporation 



POWER LIGHT HEAT 

STREET CAR SERVICE 



Good Wishes for the Tubman Girls 
Expressed in Efficient Service 



UNION SAVINGS BANK 

of Augusta, Ga. 



WM. SCHWEIGERT, Pies. THOS. S. GRAY, V.-Pres. & Cashier 

R. M. RILEY, Asst. Cashier 



4% on Savings Paid Quarterly 



(135) 



Class '2^ 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 






The National Exchange Bank 
of Augusta 

Augusta, Georgia 

ONLY NATIONAL BANK IN Al^GUSTA 

Capital and Surplus - - $700,000.00 

OFFICERS 

P. E. MAY, President 
E. A. PENDLETON, Vice-President 
PAUL Ml'STIN, Vice-President 
W. T. WIGGINS, Cashier 

FOUR PER CENT ON SAVINGS 



+ — . . — 



— 4. 



A. H. MERRY E. B. MERRY 

\V. A. COOK, Sales Manager K. H. MERRY, Assistant :Manager 

ESTABLISHED 1899 

MERRY BROTHERS 

Mamifactxirers of 

BRICK AND CLAY 
PRODUCTS 

City Office: Rooms 213-21-i Herald Building— Phone 571 
Plant: 110-130 Gwinnett St.— Phone 1410 

YOFNG LADIES : See that vour future homes are built with MERRY 
BROTHERS BRICK. Remember, you have promised. 



(13(i) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A ^MAX 



Clasn '22 



Compliments 

MODJESKA 
IMPERIAL 
RIALTO 

Theatres 



FLOWERS OCCASIONS 




227 8th Street 
"Augusta's Telegraph Florist" 



(137) 



Class '22 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Tubman 



THIS BANK 

is not restricted in the scope of its patronage. It is broad enough to 
accommodate all, and HERE ARE ITS PATRONS— 



1 . Tlic voung folks with their 
small savings. 

2. The bread-winner, striving to 
accumulate a fund to procure 
a home, or a comjjetencv for 
old age. 



3. The well-to-do, for the con- 
venience afforded and the in- 
come provided. 

-!. Those with idle funds await- 
infj other investment. 



FOUR PER CENT INTEREST Gom])ounded Quarterly, Paid to All. 
Deposits Mav Be Made by Mail 

THE AUGUSTA SA\ INGS BANK 

.S27 BROAD STREET AUGUSTA, GA. 

Fortv-two Years of Faithful Service 



Stelling-Nickerson Shoe Co. 

810 BROAD STREET 

Retailers of 

FASHIONABLE FOOTWEAR 

"YOUR INSPECTION INVITED" 



(138) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '^2 



4. — ..- 






You'll Like Our Work 



We have enjoyed a period of successful operating for over twenty-five 
years. We are ottering you QUALITY WORK and PROMPT SER- | 
VICE. Those dainty shirt waists and flimsy negligee will be prop- 
erly handled and carefully laundered. In fact if its anything to be 
laundered remember — 

Hulse Laundry 

"Just a Good One" 
513 PHONES 6871 



L. J. Henry 

"The Typewriter Man' 



REMINGTON 

MONARCH 

SMITH PREMIER 

and 

CORONA 

TYPEWRITERS 



129 Eighth Street 



MORRISON 

Satisfactory 
Contractor 

112 EIGHTH ST. 

Phone 288 

A J nil uo na ni kH..^ii._in.^i|.^ii..^ii— ■■^ll^ltl* 



(139) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Class ">Z2 



MURPHY 

STATIONERY 

COMPANY 

Hi^h Grade 

Correspondence 

Papers and Cards 

ENCJRAVEING 

GRADUATION AND GIFT 
BOOKS 

^Vate^l^aIl Fountain Pens 
Kodaks and Films 

812 Broad Street I 



Kind's Pharmacy 

Norris and Nunnally's 
Candies 

Home Made Ice Cream 

Cor. Broad and i:3tli Sts. 

Plione 615 
Al^Gl'STA, GEORGIA 



Gids!! 
Remember: 

You want to be 
UP-TO-DATE of course, 
and let us install for you 
a modern All-Gas kitclien 
when you start 
to HOUSEKEEPING. 

— o — 

The Gas Light Co. 

OF AUGUSTA 





THESE TWO 
FEEDS MAKE 

STURDY 
CHICKS 

I 



The best 
by iesi 
sold only in 
Checkerboard 
Ba^s by — 

Consumers Grocery Co. 

Distributors for Purina Feeds 
Phone 783 1101 Broad St. 



(IH)) 



Class "2% MAIDS and A MAN Tubman 


4..—.. ^ . , 

Henry W. Weathers 


h -i 


134 EIGHTH STREET 

Union Savings Bank Bldg. 


Motor Co. 




Alfred John Fazio 


Distributors for 

HUDSON 
ESSEX 

OLDSMOBILE 
DURANT 

CARS 




Maker of 

LADIES' ajid MExN'S SUITS 

and RIDING HABITS 

We Design, Cut, Trim and 
Make Here at Home Suits of 
Higliest Excellence at Prices 
Lower than Ready Mades. 

Telephone 3478 


815-17-19 Ellis Street 




AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 
PHONE 935 

h. .. .. .. .. „ „ 


+ — , „_.._„_.._. .... . ^ 


!• H 


.._,._.._.._.._.._.._„_.._.._.._„_.._„ J. 



TROWBRIDGE 

HARDWARE 

COMPANY 

L. F. Trowbridge, Prop. 

Devoe Paints, Beaver Board, 
Lime and Cement, Rubber 
Roofing, Wire Fence, Har- 
ness, Saddles. 

SYRACUSE PLOWS 
A SPECIALTY 

Wholesale Warehouse — 

637-639-641 Twiggs St. 

Retail Store — 847 Broad St. 



"Chiropractor" 

License by State of Ga. 

Leonard Knowles 

Palmer School Graduate 
MASONIC BUILDING 



(Ul) 



Class ''2'2 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



At Commencement Time 

What gift more ap])ropri- 
ate than candy? And what 
candv more ap})ro]jriate 
than "NUNX ALLY'S? 

The NUNNALLY boxes 
are carefully selected and 
packed to jjlease the most 
discriminating purciiaser. 

The doliciousness of the 
candy — tlie attractiveness 
of the packages and the 
price at which they are sold 
make them the perfect gift 
at all times. 

Lisist on Xinnially's from 

WATSON DRUG CO. 

928 Broad St. 
Phone 637 Phone 9156 



Oh! "Girls" 

Satisfaction 
Comes in 
the Genuine 




cca\ 




IN BOTTLES 

Augusta Coca-Cola 
Bottling Co. 



LOMBARD 
IRON WORKS 
h SUPPLY CO. 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

MACHINERY^ 

SUPPLIES 

REPAIRS 

CASTING 
ROOFING 

Pl^MPS 

Everything for the Mill 



Compliments of 



(HI)? 
Augusta (lII)rnutrlF 

The South's Oldest Newspaper 



.^ .5..- 



Tubman MAIDS 


and A MAN Class '22 




SMITH BROS. 
COMPANY 




(it'orsre C. HlMin-hanl Fraiiris A. C:illimiii 

BLANCHARD 

h 


— 




CALHOUN 


Wholesale 

Grocers and Grain 
Dealers 

— 




REAL ESTATE 

Insurance 
Investment Securities 


Specializing 




— o — 
Homes for Sale Convenient to 


OMEGA FLOLTl 




TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 


Plain 




— 


DOLLY DIMPLE FLOUR 




Masonic Building 


Self-Rising 


^ 


AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 


,?„ — „ — ,. — .. — .. — .. — .. — .. — .. — ■■ — •■ — •■ — <• — » 


- 


READ— 


Old Standard 




"I'he Story 
of the Bath" 


Paints 




It tells you 






how you can have: 






Good Health 


O Connor-Schweers 




Good Color 


Paint Company 




A Clear Complexion 


815 Broad Street 




Get Free Copy 

Ask 


Augusta, Georgia 




THE HENRY HUTT CO. 






HONOR - QUALITY - SERVICE 




H 


Since 1905 
h .._„_.._.,_„_.._, — .._.._„ .* 



(U3) 



Class '« 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubr 



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GARDELLE'S 1 

The Reliable Drii^ Store 

— o — 

ire carry a complete line of 

Elizabeth Arden 

Toilet Goods 

Agents for 

Whitman's and Hollin^sworth's 

CANDIES 

Physicians" Prescriptions 
Our Specialty 

— o — 

GARDELLE\S 

Opposite Monument 
lU BROAD STREET 



BUY 

The Tubman 

Girls 

GRADUATION 

GIETS 

AT 

SCHWEIGERTS 

The Leading Jeweler 



CASH AND CARRY 
SELF SERVICE 



CARPENTER S 

50-50 
GROCERTERIA 



WE DELIVER ORDERS 
OF $10 OR MORE 

710 Broad Street 
Phone 3649 



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HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Spaulding's 
Athletic Goods 

When purchasing equi])- 
nient for basket ball, base 
ball, foot ball, tennis or any 
athletic sport, insist u])on 
SPALDING'S. Satisfaction 
is inevitable. 

We have accepted the ex- 
clusive Agency for Spalding's 
Athletic goods. 

Right now our stocks are 
complete and we welcome you 
to come and see them. 

Girls and Misses INIiddy 
Blouse and Skirts, (Lucctte) 
Gingham Dresses, Hose, Cor- 

L.SYLVESTER&SONS 



(144) 



Tubman 



MAIDS and A MAX 



Class "k 



I 



Goetchius' 



Broad and Seventh Sts. 



DRUGS 

SODA WATER 
KODAKS 
CANDY 



Goetchius' 



4.,_.._..—._.._=. 



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OMf Jiu^uh^Wi^ei^ 



FROM 



Balk's Nursery 

226 Greene Street 
Phone 585 



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L. J. SCHAUL & CO. 

Di:imoiuls 

aiul 

Jewelry 

840 Broad Street 

Phone 545 
Augusta, Georgia 



1 
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4- 



Alexander & Garrett 

FIRE INSURANCE 

LOANS 

REAL ESTATE 

Lamar Bldg. Augusta, Ga. 



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Land Drug Co. 



(145) 






Class 'g 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tub ma)) 



Phoenix Mutual Life Ins. Co. 

Orgjluizeil isril 

Fo)' You and You)-s 

D. B. Dowling 

District Agent 
22.5 MASONIC BUILDING 



COTTON 
T. I. Hickman 

Campbell Bldg. 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



•f* — nil— — iiu^— 4IU 



GIRLS! 

Make "Papa" buy you a 
Home on The Hill from 

Geo. W. Hard wick 

Heal Estate a))(J Insurance 
17 Campbell Bldg. 



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Hemstreet &: Alexander 

REPAIRING OF FIRE ARMS, 
SAFES, ETC. 

Guns, Revolvers, Fishing Tackle 

Kfij Fittinff a Specialty 

Ltm')i Mowers Sharpened 

Telephone 679 



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WHITNEY-McNEILL | 
ELECTRIC CO. | 

Lighting Fixtures & Lamps s 
of Quality j 

EVKRYTHI.XG ELECTRICAL f 

APPLIANCES, ETC. I 



841 BROAD STREET 

Teleiihiine I'Mi't 



E. (). Cooper Wm. M. Nixon, Jr, 

COOPER c^ NIXON 

GENERAL 1 

INSURANCE 



Phone '21fi7 



128 Eighth St. 



,. — + 



+ . ., . 

E. J. IIEKNLEX KKEI) IIEKKINC 

WIRTZ cV HERNLIN 
COMPANY 



— Dealers in — 

Farm Machinery of All 
Description and Hardware 

John Deere Line 
601 Broad St. Plione 360-i 



For Best Building Materials 
Call on 

Youngblood Roofing 
and Mantel Company 

635 Broad St. Augusta, Ga. 



(U(i) 



Tub in (in 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '"22 



BOWEN BROS. 
HARDWARE CO 

829 Broad St. 
BASKET BALLS, TENNIS 
GOODS, SWEATERS, 
SPORTING GOODS OF 
EVERY KIND. 



4.._.._„_,._„_„_.._,._.. 






Kodak Finishing 

The Waij It Should be Done | 

Tony Sheehan 

211 Eighth St. 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



MERCHANTS-- 

Your troubles relative to making 
Income Tax Returns is put to an 
end, by our up-to-date STORE 
SYSTEMS. Investu/ate Today. 

The National Cash Register Co. 



825 Telfair St. 



Augusta, Ga. 






Georgia Vitrified Brick [ 
and Clay Company 



I 
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Manufacturers of the Famous 

"AUGUSTA" BLOCK 



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Plaza Market 

Meats and Fish 

512 NINTH ST. PHONE 1845 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



CASTLEBERRY 

AND WILCOX 

Grocers 

Cordially invite you to visit their store, 
tli2 most complete j^rocery store in 

Aus'usta. 

Constant Fresh Shipments in every de- 

partent. Orders promptly executed by 

mail. 

706 BROAD STREET 



FOUND : A place to enter- 
tain my senior frineds at a 
moderate price. Where.'' 



The Tea Shop 

314 Jackson St. Mrs. Plumb 



I Augusta Drug Co. 

Wholesale Druggists 

305 to 311 JACKSON ST. 
Augusta, Ga. 



(U7) 



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Class '22 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Tubman 



-"•?• 



Awnings 
Porch Shades 
Wall Paper 

T. G. Bailie & Co. 

712 BROAD STREET 



A Place to Eat 

Vorhauer's Vienna Bakery 
AND 

None Such Cafe 

720 Bniadway 
AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



VISIT 

The Cozy Store 

\^'lK*^^' vim will find new ;ui(l well 
selcrted stni-ks of 

MILLINERY, WAISTS, 

UNL Sl'AL GIFTS 

NOVELTIES 

E. C. BALK cV CO. 

!)1« Broad St. Phone 382 



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Picture Framing 

We solicit yinir jiatronafje in Pic- 
ture Framing-. We fiuarantee work- 
manship and goods of the best 
(Hiality. Respectfully, 

Harper Bros. Art Stroe 

■126 Eiglitli St. Phone 730 



SIBERT ,k ROBISON | 

General Contractors ' 

1 

House Buildcr.s, Repair.s and | 

Alterations, Fire Damage j 

A])prai.sal.s and Estiniate.s. I 

Union Savings Hank Bhlg. ! 



J. FRANK CARSWELL 

Dhlrict ilanatjer j 

State Mutual Life As.surance 1 

Company j 

lUiSthSt. Augu.sta, Ga. I 

FRANK \V. Bl'KU ■ 

tlcneral Atrent for (leor^ia I 

JOS ii-io Henley Blili;. Atla}]tM. (in. | 



T. D. Cary h Co. [ 

Investment j 

Securities I 

Augusta, Georgia. i 



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C. H. \'an Ormer 

Builder 

Herald Bldg. 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



(i+«) 



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Tub III (HI 



MAIDS and A MAN 



Class '22 



-DRINK- 



Chero-Cola 

"There's None So Good" 



DENNIS COAL AND 
WOOD CO. i 

Hig'h Grade Coal \ 

G. H. DENNIS, Prop. j 

Phone 2326 Augusta, Ga. ! 






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The Handi-Craft Shop 

Art Needle Work Supplies 

Embroidery Materials 
209 Eighth St. 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



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VON KAMP'S 

Dry Goods 
Ready-to- Wear 

Best Values in Augusta 
858 Broad St. 

* ,. . ._ 



•j^n-^l.«^N< —1.. — -m 



C. T. Pund & Co. 

Dealers in 

GROCERS' 
SPECIALTIES 

Ask for 
CORBY'S CAKE 



.}.,_.. 



.11 1. uu iivp' 



Maxwell Brothers I 
FURNITURE 

937 Broad St. Phone 836 
Augusta, Georgia 

4-,. — „, — „ — „„ — „, — „, — ,„ — „. — „ — „ — „, — „, — „ — „,{. 



THOUSANDS 

of Tennis and Basket Ball 
Shoes a great deal cheaper 
than anybody sells them. 
Kids a Specialty 

Great Eastern Shoe Co. 

R. G. TARVER, Mgr. 



When You Get Your Husband, 

May We Not Furnish Your 

Happy Honie.^ 




(149)